Spring Couplets: Ushering in the New Year in Style

:::

2014 / 2月

Sam Ju /photos courtesy of Chuang Kung-ju /tr. by Jonathan Barnard


At Chinese New Year’s people hang up spring couplets to provide some bright red festiveness, as well as to show off the aesthetic beauty of the calligraphy. In recent years handwritten couplets have been undergoing a transformation. No longer stodgy and staid, these calligraphies are increasingly appreciated by young people. They securely hold the top spot among the handicrafts that engender New Year’s spirit.


On January 18, two weekends ahead of New Year’s Eve, before even 9 a.m. a crowd is lining up at the Tai­pei Confucius Temple for an event in which New Year’s couplets are brushed and handed out to members of the public.

Its plaza holds 20 some-odd tables, with a line of ten to 20 people in front of each. The crowd includes grandparents and young couples with five- or six-year-old kids, all of whom come for an ample dose of New Year’s spirit.

At 10 a.m. sharp the calligraphers, all members of the ROC Society of Calligraphy Education, take their positions. They may not be great masters, but they hold solid skills and are quite experienced. Many have been coming to the event for more than 20 years.

From peach wood amulets

The practice of writing New Year’s couplets evolved from the use of peach wood amulets during the Five Dynasties era. Artists would paint images of the Daoist deities ­Shetu and Yu­lei on boards of peach wood. These would be hung at the gateway of a house to welcome good fortune and repel evil. Symmetry was already highly emphasized.

According to legend, during the Ten Kingdoms era Meng ­Chang (919–965), the emperor of Later Shu, wrote on a peach board: “At New Year’s there is a surplus to celebrate; may the festivities presage a long spring.” It was the first recorded example of a celebratory couplet written for Chinese New Year’s. Later, Zhu Yuan­zhang (1328–1398), the first Ming emperor, would embrace the habit, thereby planting seeds for the custom to take root throughout China.

Lin Mao-­hsien, an associate professor of Taiwanese literature at National Tai­chung University, explains that couplets, though uniformly conveying auspiciousness, often vary depending on profession and locale.

For instance, in hopes of an abundant harvest, farmers might put up, “The courtyard basks amid splendorous sounds of a gentle spring, as peace pervades fields of abundance.” Meanwhile, a merchant, hoping for positive cash flow, might instead choose, “Grasses grow with vigor during spring’s three months, as the river delivers its nurturing bounty from far away.”

Different strokes for different folks

When you face a couplet, the first line (on the right) is described as being on the “dragon side” and the second line (on the left) is described as being on the “tiger side.” In his book Ringing Out the Old Year and Welcoming In the New, author Yang Hua­kang describes four main principles for the creation of couplets: using the same number of characters on each line, creating parallel structures, employing phrases with complementary meanings, and achieving a suitable rhythm, usually with the first line ending in an “oblique” tone, and the second line ending in a “level” tone. (This distinction is an important part of the rhyming schemes used in classical poetry. The level tone is one of the four tone classes of Middle Chinese. The other three—“rising,” “departing” and “entering,” are together called the oblique tones. Characters with the level tone in Middle Chinese generally have a high level tone [first tone] or high rising tone [second tone] in modern Mandarin.) By following those simple guidelines, it’s easy to come up with couplets on your own.

A breakfast joint specializing in baking sesame-seed coated cakes, for instance, might hang up, “At the sound of firecrackers, my cake is the largest. Peach amulets are hung in 10,000 households: Let’s see who has the most sesame seeds.” Using exaggeratedly boastful language while maintaining an appropriate cadence only adds to the festiveness.

Because Taiwan long ago entered the ranks of industrial societies, many citizens now live in cramped high-rise apartments with restrictions on what they can hang outside their front door. Consequently, shorter calligraphies have come into fashion. These include four-character calligraphies such as “The money rolls in” or single characters for “Spring” (春—chun) or “Good Fortune” (福—fu) which are placed upside down to convey the idea that spring or wealth has arrived (“upside down” is a homonym for “arrived” in Mandarin). Four characters that mean “ushering in wealth and prosperity” (招財進寶—zhao cai jin bao) are also frequently combined into one character.

Lin stresses that selecting characters for a couplet demands consideration of the characteristics of the site. For instance, farms are suitable places for “All six types of livestock flourish,” but putting the same line in a bedroom would suggest that the resident couple would give birth to animals. “Full” is well suited for granaries or cash boxes, signifying that a household will lack for neither food nor money, but if you hung it in a bathroom, it would convey an image of overflowing sewage pipes.

When in Rome…

For the free New Year’s calligraphies at the Tai­pei Confucius Temple, the organizers supplied a total of 3000 calligraphic papers sized to fit seven- or four-character couplet lines, as well as diamond-shaped papers for single-character calligraphies. Apart from the standard red paper, there is also paper sprinkled with gold dust, as well as paper printed with an eave tile pattern.

After the calligraphies are hung to dry in the open air, they are handed over to members of the public. ­Huang Su­zhen, director-general of the ROC Calligraphy Education Society, explains that some people don’t have time to wait. Consequently, in addition to brushing calligraphies that day at the temple, calligraphers also prepare some at home, so that those in a rush can pick them up quickly.

For the many people that want to see the calligraphies brushed for themselves, the calligraphers bring along a list of suitable couplets to choose from. For instance, ­Huang provides a notebook full of brushed examples, such as “With perseverance nothing is impossible; peace at home rises from tolerance.”

“The public is diverse, and everyone likes to be different,” ­Huang notes. “Consequently, when preparing potential couplets you’ve got to appeal to as many tastes as possible.”

What’s more, due to popular demand, ­Huang also provides a notebook full of the most common combinatorial single characters. For instance, the combinatorial character for “Study Confucius and Mencius well” is well suited to hanging in a study in anticipation of exam success. The combinatorial for “seeing money day after day” is used in the same kind of places as “ushering in wealth and prosperity.” Both symbolize uninterrupted prosperity.

On the day of the event, numerous foreign tourists show up to collect some couplets. One woman from an English-speaking country asks if it would be possible to add an English annotation. Consequently, when brushing in Chinese­, “Spring arrives among the people; Happy New Year,” ­Huang also leaves some space to write in English: “Happy New Year.”

“At New Year’s having a lot of fun and making people happy is most important,” says Huang. “There’s no need to be a stickler about tradition.”

New Year’s gets younger and hipper

One of the calligraphers is retired Taiwanese-language singing star Lin Xiu­zhu, age 71, who already has more than ten years of experience at the event. She modestly says that she isn’t a true calligrapher, merely a lover of art who began to practice calligraphy after she turned 50. In recent years she has been enraptured with oil painting, and in her own estimation, “My painting is better than my calligraphy.” Consequently, she humbly asks those taking her calligraphies if they’d like her to give them a livelier feel by embellishing them with additional designs.

Indeed, unlike printed New Year’s couplets, hand-brushed works demonstrate all kinds of delightful variations that provide interest beyond the calligraphy. Most commonly, one can see the year’s Chinese zodiac animal painted somewhere on the calligraphic paper.

For instance, since the coming year is the Year of the Horse, when brushing, “Success comes with the arrival of the horse,” one can use a pictogram for a horse in place of the standard Chinese character, thereby giving the four-character couplet a more contemporary feel.

Lin’s grandson Luo ­Shaoqi, now a fifth-grader, first attended the New Year’s calligraphy event at the Confucius Temple with his grandmother back when he was three. The media immediately dubbed him a “calligraphic prodigy.” Requests for regular, semi-cursive or cursive script don’t faze him this year. The public is particularly curious about him, and he always has crowds gathered around his table. Every time he finishes a calligraphy, the onlookers ooh and ah, but he always maintains his cool.

It takes courage to write New Year’s couplets on a plaza crowded with onlookers. Even if you’re well practiced writing them in your study at home, you may not be comfortable the first time you try to write them outdoors. ­Huang Su­zhen says that the ROC Society of Calligraphy Education doesn’t expect the calligraphers who come to the event at the Tai­pei Confucius Temple to produce perfect work amid all the give and take with the public. The key thing is to ramp up the holiday spirit and festive atmosphere.

Says ­Huang: “Watching so many people line up to obtain New Year’s couplets and seeing so many mainland Chinese tourists purchase and collect calligraphies using traditional Chinese characters, I can’t help but think that the tradition of writing spring couplets has a bright future.”

相關文章

近期文章

繁體中文 日文

春聯:最有氣質的年味

文‧朱立群 圖‧莊坤儒

過年貼春聯,一來討它紅色的喜氣,二來看它書法的美感。近幾年,手寫春聯加入圖像的變化,不再LKK(老氣橫秋),越來越受年輕人歡迎,穩居年味氣質排行榜的第一名。


1月18日,農曆除夕前倒數第2個周末,上午9點多出現了排隊的人潮。這裡不是人氣餐廳,也不是名牌新款3C產品開賣的場合,而是台北孔廟揮毫送春聯的日子。

廣場上擺了二十幾張寫字桌,每張桌子前都排了一、二十人,行列裡有六十幾歲的老先生、老太太,也有年輕家長帶著5、6歲的小朋友,來此提前感受過年的熱鬧氣氛。

10點整,書法家們站定揮毫位置,接下來的幾個小時,桌上的紅紙寫完一張再換一張,手上的毛筆沒有停過,儘量滿足民眾的需求。

排隊的民眾七嘴八舌,有人說,「沒有貼春聯,就不像在過年。」也有人說,「就算自己不貼,當作禮物送給親朋好友也很得體。」

這些書法家都是中華民國書法教學研究學會的會員,雖不是大師級的名家,但功夫紮實,身經百戰,已連續二十多年受邀當眾揮毫迎春。

春聯源自桃符
明朝始成為年俗

春聯源自中國五代時期的「桃符」,於辭舊迎新之際,在桃木板上分別畫上「神荼」、「鬱壘」二神的圖像,懸掛於門首,意在祈福滅禍。就圖像呈現的方式來看,可見當時桃符已有「對稱」的概念。

相傳十國後蜀皇帝孟昶,因不滿意下屬寫的桃符題詞,而自行重寫「新年納餘慶,佳節號長春」。根據考究,這是中國第一幅以排比文句書寫的春聯。

爾後經過明太祖朱元璋的提倡,確立了過年貼春聯的習俗。據說有一回他微服出巡,經過一戶門上沒貼春聯的人家,一問才知這戶是閹豬的,想不出文句、也沒請人代寫。朱元璋聞畢,立刻為這戶人家寫了「雙手劈開生死路,一刀割斷是非根」的春聯,文詞幽默,流傳至今。

台中教育大學台灣文學系副教授林茂賢表示,除了吉祥話之外,不同行業也有不同的春聯用語。譬如農家可用「門庭春暖聲光彩,田畝年豐樂太平」,祈願五穀豐收、闔家平安;商家則可貼「三春草長如生意,萬里河流似利源」,表示財源滾滾。

用語因行業、場所而異
別鬧笑話

左右對聯式的春聯,上聯(正對春聯的右手邊)是龍邊,下聯(正對春聯的左手邊)是虎邊。作家楊華康在《談年、過年、迎新年》書裡指出,只要把握上、下聯文詞用語字數相等、結構相同、詞意相襯、聲韻相協(通常是上聯仄聲、下聯平聲)四大原則,民眾也可像明太祖為閹豬戶題寫的對句一樣,自行發想創意春聯。

譬如,早餐燒餅店可貼「爆竹一聲,唯獨我的燒餅大;桃符萬戶,且看誰家芝麻多」,用略帶誇張但不失幽默的句子,為新年增添喜氣。

台灣已從農業社會轉型為工商社會,許多民眾住在公寓、大樓裡,礙於空間不足或住宅公約的規定,不被允許張貼對聯式的春聯,因而發展出單張、小幅的四字聯,例如「財源滾滾」、「開工大吉」,或方塊狀的一字貼,如上下倒寫的「春」、「福」意謂春到、福到,以及常見「招財進寶」寫成一字的組合字。

不過,林茂賢提醒,選用春聯的詞句、用語,必須考量場所、位置與空間的特性。

譬如,農場適合貼「六畜興旺」,但若貼在臥室,則是詛咒夫妻生出畜牲;「滿」則適合貼在米缸或存錢筒上,象徵豐衣足食、錢財不缺,但若貼在廁所內,則是恨不得屎尿滿出,有觸霉頭之意。

春聯討吉利
外國遊客入境隨俗

今年的孔廟揮毫送春聯,主辦單位準備了裁成長形七字聯、四字聯及菱形單字聯共約3,000張的春聯紙,除了基本款紅紙之外,也有表面灑上金粉或在下筆位置蓋有瓦當印的紙張。

現場寫好的春聯掛在一旁晾乾後,才能贈送給民眾。帶領書法家們揮毫的中華民國書法教學研究學會理事長黃素珍表示,有些民眾無法久候,因此書法家們除了現場揮毫之外,也在家預先寫好一些春聯,以便民眾當天快速領取。

至於針對多數想要看到現場揮毫的民眾,書法家們準備了春聯參考用語供民眾選擇。譬如,黃素珍的筆記本裡,用毛筆字寫滿「一勤天下無難事、百忍堂中有太和」,以及上、下聯「三陽開泰春報喜、五福臨門獻祥瑞」,加上橫批,「九重春色映華堂」等激勵、祝福的對聯文句,用詞清新脫俗、不刻板。

「民眾來自不同的背景,且每人喜好不同,因此準備的用語必須要能符合多數人的需求,」黃素珍說。

此外,針對最多人索取的一字聯,黃素珍也準備了許多組合字的範本。例如「學好孔孟」組成的單字,適合貼在書房,祝福金榜題名;「日日有見財」的組合字,則與「招財進寶」有異曲同工之妙,象徵財源不絕。

揮毫當天,現場也有不少好奇的國外遊客排隊領取春聯。一位來自英語系國家的婦人希望能夠加註英文,因此,黃素珍寫完「春到人間、新年快樂」後,二話不說,在不破壞中文字書法美感的前提下,在預留的空白處寫上「Happy New Year」。

「大過年的,大家開心、歡喜就好,不用太在意正統、不正統,」黃素珍說。

傳統春聯年輕化
納入圖像造型

「啊,真的是妳?」在揮毫的會場上,排隊民眾認出一位低著頭寫春聯的書法家,正是台語老歌〈三聲無奈〉的原唱人林秀珠。

71歲的林秀珠已有十幾年參與新春揮毫的經驗。她謙虛地說,自己不是書法家,純粹因為喜歡藝術,才在50歲之後從頭開始練習。由於近幾年迷上油畫,她自認目前「畫得比寫得好」,所以她會不好意思地詢問領取春聯的民眾,是否需要畫上一些裝飾的圖案,好讓整體感覺看起來活潑一些。

確實,有別於制式的機器印製春聯,傳統的手寫春聯反而靈活變化出討喜的花樣,讓春聯除了書法之外,越來越有書畫的趣味。最常見的,就是在春聯上,畫出農曆生肖動物的意象。

譬如今年是馬年,在寫「馬到成功」時,可用象形的圖案取代中規中矩的「馬」字,讓這幅四字聯看起來更有現代感。或者像黃素珍在蛇年時喜歡用蛇的可愛意象,一氣呵成地寫完「蛇年如意」的「如」;從視覺上來看,左半邊「女」字第一筆畫狀似蛇頭吐信,右半邊「口」字則以蛇尾結尾。

林秀珠的外孫羅劭騏就讀小學五年級,3歲跟外婆一起參加孔廟揮毫,當年還被媒體封為「書法神童」。今年他也回到孔廟寫春聯,楷書、行書、草書都難不倒他。民眾對他特別好奇,擠到桌邊看他寫字,每寫完一張,民眾就發出驚呼,但他絲毫不受影響,保持氣定神閒。

在大庭廣眾之下寫春聯需要膽識,已經習慣在書房內寫字的書法名家,初次到戶外寫春聯,反而未必習慣。黃素珍說,書法教學研究學會的會員到孔廟寫春聯,與民眾結緣互動,不求寫得完美,大家能夠過年開心就好。

「看到那麼多人排隊索取手寫春聯,以及不少大陸遊客購買、收藏繁體中文的書法,相信春聯的傳統習俗只會興盛,不會消失,」黃素珍樂觀地說。

「春聯」で品格ある春節気分を

文・朱立群 写真・荘坤儒

春節には門に春聯(縁起の良い対句などを書いて門に貼る赤い紙)を貼るものだ。春聯は、その赤い色がめでたさを象徴し、また、その書の美を鑑賞することもできる。最近は、おめでたい言葉に縁起のよい図案を書き入れた手書きの春聯も増え、お年寄りだけでなく、若い世代にも広く受け入れられている。春聯は、春節らしさを象徴するもののトップに挙げられるであろう。


 

1月18日、旧暦の大晦日の2週間前、朝の9時から行列ができていた。だが、ここは有名なレストランでもなければ、デジタル製品の発売会場でもなく、台北の孔子廟である。この日、ここでは手書きの春聯が配られるのである。

広場には20余りの机が置かれ、それぞれの机に10~20人の行列が出来ている。行列の中には60代のお年寄りもいれば、幼い子供を連れた若い親もいて、それぞれ春節の雰囲気を楽しんでいる。

午前10時、書家たちが筆をふるい始める。机には次々に赤い紙が広げられ、筆が止まることはなく、書き上がった春聯を行列に並んだ人々が受け取っていく。

順番を待っている人々は、口々に「春聯がなければ春節を迎えた気分が出ません」「春聯は贈り物にしても喜ばれますし」と言う。

ここに参加している書家は、中華民国書法教学研究学会の会員で、書の大家というわけではないが実力者揃い。すでに20余年にわたってここで春聯を書いている。

魔除けの札から始まった風習
明の時代に普及

春聯の起源は、中国の五代十国時代に始まった「桃符」の風習である。新しい年を迎える時、2枚の桃の木の板にそれぞれ「神荼」と「鬱塁」の二神の像を描いて門の両側にかけ、魔除けにしたものである。二神を門の左右に一神ずつかけるという方法から、当時すでに「対称」の概念があったことがうかがえる。

十国後蜀の皇帝・孟昶は、部下が書いた桃符の詞が気に入らず、自ら「新年納余慶、佳節号長春」と書き直した言われ、これが中国で初めて対句(対聯)を書いた春聯だとされている。

後に明の太祖、朱元璋がこれを提唱したことで、春節に家々の門に春聯を貼る風習が確立された。言い伝えによると、朱元璋が市中を巡視した時、春聯を貼っていない家が一軒あった。聞くと豚の去勢を生業としている家で、よい対句が思いつかず、代筆も頼んでいないということだった。そこで朱元璋は自ら筆を執り、「双手劈開生死路、一刀割断是非根(両手で生死の路を切り開き、一刀で是非の根を切りさく)」と書いて贈った。ユーモアに富んだ対句であるため、今日まで伝わっている。

台中教育大学台湾文学科の副教授・林茂賢によると、春聯には縁起の良い言葉の他に、業種にちなんだ言葉も使われるという。例えば農家なら「門庭春暖声光彩、田畝年豊楽太平」という対句で豊作と一家の無病息災を願い、商家なら「三春草長如生意、万里河流似利源」と商売繁盛を願う。

業種や場所によって異なる対句
恥をかかないためのルール

左右一対の句である春聯の、門に向って右側を上聯(龍辺)、左側を下聯(虎辺)と言う。作家・楊華康は著書『談年、過年、迎新年』の中で、対句は上聯と下聯の字数が同じで、文法や構造も、意味の上でもシンメトリックになり、韻は通常、上聯が仄声、下聯が平声になっているという四大原則が守られていれば良いと述べている。このルールに従えば、私たちも明の太祖のように自分でオリジナルの春聯を創作することもできるのである。

例えば、朝食の焼餅(小麦粉のお焼き)を売る店なら、「爆竹一声、唯独我的焼餅大:桃符万戸、且看誰家芝麻多」(我の店の焼餅はどこよりも大きい:どの店の胡麻が多いか見てほしい)という具合に、ややオーバーだがユーモラスな対句は正月らしい雰囲気をかもしだす。

現在の台湾では多くの人がアパートやマンションに住んでおり、場所が狭かったり、マンションの規則などで左右二枚の春聯を貼れないことも多い。そこで増えてきたのが小さめの紙に「財源滾滾」とか「開工大吉」といった四文字を書いたものや、正方形の紙に「春」や「福」など一文字を書き、それを逆さまに貼って「春の到来」や「福の到来」を表すものなどである。

ただ、林茂賢は、春聯の言葉によっては貼る場所に注意する必要があるという。

例えば農場には「六畜興旺」という春聯を貼るといいが、これを夫婦の寝室に貼れば、二人の間に動物が生まれるよう願うことになってしまう。また「満」の文字は米櫃や貯金箱に貼れば衣食やお金に困らないことを意味するが、トイレに貼れば、便器が溢れてしまうかも知れない。

縁起のよい春聯
外国人観光客にも人気

孔子廟での春聯揮毫の主催機関は、今年、細長い七字聯と四字聯と菱形の一文字聯を合計3000枚用意した。ベーシックな赤い紙の他に、金粉をあしらったものや、文字を書く位置に吉祥の丸い印が押されているものもある。

会場で書かれた春聯は、墨を乾かしてから希望者に贈られる。中華民国書法教学研究学会の黄素珍理事長によると、長く待てない人々のために、書家たちは家で書いてきたものも用意しているという。

また、会場で書家に自分の好きな春聯を書いてもらいたいという人々のために、彼らは参考になる言葉も用意している。例えば黄素珍のノートには、「一勤天下無難事、百忍堂中有太和」や、左右に「三陽開泰春報喜、五福臨門献祥瑞」と上に「九重春色映華堂」という横批を組み合わせたものなど、縁起が良く、しかもありきたりではない対句がたくさん書かれている。

「春聯をもらいに来る人々の背景はさまざまで、それぞれ好みも違います。ですから、多くの人の要求にかなう言葉を用意しておかなければなりません」と黄素珍は話す。

また、最も多く求められる一文字聯についても、その組み合わせの見本をたくさん用意している。例えば、「学好孔孟」の四文字の組み合わせは、受験や学業の成就を祈って勉強部屋に貼るとよく、「日日有見財」の組み合わせは「招財進宝」と同様、金運を願うものだ。

孔子廟の会場では、興味深そうに見学して春聯を受け取っていく外国人観光客も少なくない。英語圏から来た女性は、英語も書いてほしいと希望したので、黄素珍は「春到人間、新年快楽」という春聯を書き、漢字の美観を損ねないように、空けておいた余白に「Happy New Year」と書き添えた。

「お正月ですから、みんなが楽しい気持ちになることが大切なので、正統かどうかはあまり気にする必要はありません」と言う。 

図案も加わって
伝統の春聯が若返る

「あれ?あなたは…」と、会場である人が気がついた。黙々と筆を走らせる書家の一人は、実は台湾語の懐メロ「三声無奈」をヒットさせた歌手の林秀珠なのである。

71歳になる林秀珠は、すでに十年以上にわたって新春揮毫に参加しており、自分は書家ではないが、芸術が好きなので50歳を過ぎてから書を始めたと謙遜する。最近は油絵に熱中しており、自分では「書より絵の方が上手」だと思うので、春聯を受け取った人に遠慮がちに声をかけ、春聯に縁起の良い図案も描き入れないかと問いかける。

確かに、画一的に機械で印刷された春聯に比べると、伝統の手書きの春聯は生き生きとして動きがある。春聯には書だけでなく、絵を描き入れたものも増えている。良く見られるのは、干支の動物を描き入れたものだ。

今年は午年なので、「馬到成功」という言葉の春聯が多いが、一文字目の「馬」を文字ではなく馬の姿を描いた絵にすると、全体がモダンな感じになる。黄素珍は、巳年には蛇の姿を可愛らしく描くのが好きだという。彼女が一気呵成に「蛇年如意」と書いた「如」の文字は、左側の「女」の第一画が蛇の頭のように見え、右側の「口」は蛇の尾のように見えるのである。

林秀珠の孫の羅劭騏は小学校5年生だが、3歳の時から祖母と一緒に孔子廟で筆をふるっており、その頃のメディアでは「書の神童」と報じられた。彼は今年も参加し、楷書、行書、草書と、どんな字も自在に書く。多くの人が彼を取り囲んで字を書く様子を見つめ、一枚完成するごとに歓声が上がるが、彼は少しも周囲の影響を受けず、落ち着いて筆をふるい続ける。

大勢の人に囲まれて春聯を書くには度胸と実力が備わっていなければならない。書の名人も、いつもは書斎で書いているので、屋外で多くの視線の中で書くのは、なかなか慣れないものだという。黄素珍は、書法教学研究学会の会員が孔子廟での活動に参加するのは多くの人と良い縁を結ぶためであり、書は完璧でなくても、春節の喜びを分かち合うことが大切だと考えている。

「これほど多くの人が並んで手書きの春聯をもらっていき、中国大陸からの観光客も繁体字の書を購入してコレクションするのですから、春聯の伝統はこれからもますます盛んになり、決して消えることはないでしょう」と黄素珍は語った。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!