From Coal to Cats: The Amazing Reinvention of Houdong

:::

2011 / 6月

Su Hui-chao /photos courtesy of Chuang Kung-ju /tr. by Josh Aguiar


A faded coalmining town that was once little more than a pit stop on the way to Jiufen has become a tourist hotspot, thanks to its resident cat population. What is it about this "cat paradise" that holds such tremendous appeal?


"Times sure have changed!" says one older gentleman surnamed Chen, expelling his words with a long sigh.

Chen is from Houdong, but he never identified himself as such when discussing his origins with outsiders. After all, people invariably hadn't heard of it, nor had they heard of the Ruisan coal mine that was its chief feature. You could talk until you were blue in the face, but it wouldn't do you any good.

These days, more often than not he tells people he's from Houdong instead of Jiufen, the popular daytrip destination on the north coast. Tourists now make special trips to Houdong just to see the cats, making a side excursion to see Jiufen, since "it's in the vicinity." Not just people from nearby Taipei, either. People come from as far away as Kaohsiung and Pingtung in the south. And not just Taiwanese, for that matter. There have been visitors all the way from Japan, Korea, and the United States.

Now entering cat territory

It's a whole new era, Chen comments to Jian Peiling, alias "Mrs. Dr. Kitty."

Because her husband Lin Zhengyi is director at Zhongshan Veterinary Hospital in Taipei, Jian, originally a piano teacher, has taken to calling herself "Mrs. Dr. Kitty," or "Mrs. Kitty," for short.

The stationmaster at Houdong train station, a gentleman surnamed Wang, has been able to witness the change from a close vantage. Beginning in 2009, his station welcomed an average of 600 travelers per day. On the weekends, that number shot past 1000. Those figures are more than 10 times greater than the traffic received in the past. In 2006, a blogger fresh from a visit to Houdong described it as a lonely but serene little mountain town that time had forgotten. In early spring of 2007, Mrs. Dr. Kitty set out to photograph the pride of cats after learning of their existence through the Internet. That day, suffice to say, was a watershed in the fate of the town.

It was a nondescript day four years later in mid-April, 2011 when Mrs. Dr. Kitty arrived with her Pentax 645D. Northern Taiwan was shaking off the long winter's slumber, and the Bretschneidera sinensis flowers so typical of Houdong were beginning to bud.

Now a professional photographer, she first flags down the stationmaster to discuss a pet product company's proposal to put up public hygiene information on the walls by the tracks. After that she threads her way past the pinwheels festooned on the bridge that is the only entry into Houdong's Guangfu Borough. Guangfu is suffused with charming little signs saying things like: "It is not advisable to bring dogs," "Please, no flash photography," and "Warning: now entering cat territory." Also scattered throughout are the delicate little wooden houses where the cats take refuge from the moist chill of winter.

There are about 50 cats in Houdong now. Most of the tomcats have been neutered, though a smattering of pregnant females show that the efforts have been far from exhaustive. Cats are everywhere: on roofs, stairs, broken windows, in flowery nurseries and clumps of grass, even in the bamboo hats left outside the entrances to people's homes.

From yesterday's ashes

The fate of so many mining communities has been described by the same arc: a rise to prosperity followed by descent into ruin.

Back in 1966, the owner of an economically imperiled mine in Joban, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, hit upon an interesting way to maintain the viability of his property. He relabeled the abandoned mine district "the Joban Hawaiian Center," and hired dance instructors from Tokyo to teach the local girls to dance the Hula. The story was later documented in the film Hula Girls.

If Houdong's story ever made it onto celluloid, at its essence it would be a lesson in realizing dreams. Its backdrop would be an abandoned mine, the upper reaches of the Keelung River, all framed by a ring of mountains. The cats and the residents of Guangfu would be the main attraction, no doubt, portraying themselves onscreen. Mrs. Dr. Kitty and the volunteers of the Houdong Cat Lovers Society would be the project's hot-blooded auteurs. As for the visitors, well, they would furnish the audience, as well as the occasional extra.

On the train line connecting Taipei to Yilan, Houdong is the stop immediately after Ruifang. The trip from Taipei takes less than an hour. According to the Ruifang Town History, a troop of monkeys made their dwelling in a small cave in the nearby mountains, hence the choice of the Chinese characters "monkey" (hou) and "cave" (dong). In its heyday, Houdong was the largest coal supplier in all of Taiwan, and the town was home to 2-3000 full-time residents. The miners took issue with the inclusion of the character "cave" in the town's name on account of it being written with the water radical-most inauspicious for those whose on-the-job hazards include drowning-and at their behest it was changed to another character pronounced identically, but containing the stone radical instead. Then in 1961, the government altered the other character in the town's name by eliminating the hound radical in "monkey," which they deemed insufficiently elegant. A movement began in 1991 to restore the original name, so as to honor the area's historical roots. In 2005, the Taipei County (now New Taipei City) Government passed a resolution to reinstate the original name; the signage at the train stations, however, falls under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Transportation and Communications, and so the name has not been changed there, though they rather amusingly include the old name in parentheses.

Film director Wu Nien-jen grew up in Dacukeng, a district in Houdong. Seeing his father descend into the mineshaft day after day for a career that wreaked cumulative havoc on his lungs provided the inspiration for Wu's movie A Borrowed Life, shot on location in Houdong.

The coalmines have since become a relic of history. That history has become the centerpiece of a tourism campaign with the New Taipei City Tourism and Travel Department's opening of the Houdong Coal Mine Museum in the summer of 2010. As the museum's goodwill ambassador, Wu's first order of business was to make clear to the public that "there's more to Houdong than just cats."

Kitty sanctuary

Nonetheless, however pleasant the mining museum, the coal transport bridge, the Japanese shrine, and the Jinzibei Passageway may be, by themselves they remain insufficiently alluring to tourists. It is, in the final analysis, the cats that are the feature attraction, a fact not lost on the Tourism Department, the stationmaster, or the general public.

The first trip Mrs. Dr. Kitty made out to Houdong, the cats were wary of people, flashing their tails in warning and fleeing at their approach. The second trip, however, she was swarmed by an army of cats clamoring for food, and was startled to the point that she nearly tripped over herself. Guangfu is a closed-off area and the cats enjoy advantages that would make their citified brethren jealous. Stray cats in the cities often don't make it past age two due to automobiles' constant menace.

Guangfu Borough has become a bit of a ghost town over the years. Only 40-50 full-time residents remain, and most of them are quite advanced in years. The former borough chief, Zhou Jinyi, and his wife, Wu Lihua, are both very fond of cats. Every day when they cook, they make sure to take the cats' portions into account. Four of the most famous cats, the so-called "four kings," in the community-Runny Nose, Black Nose, Kirin Tail, and Big Head-are wards of the Zhou household. The other stray cats, though bereft of permanent homes, frequently receive leftover scraps from elderly residents.

With no natural enemies and a dependable source of nutrition, the cats of Guangfu were fruitful and multiplied, from four different troops each numbering in the single digits to a population nearing 100. By the time Mrs. Kitty arrived on the scene, residents were becoming alarmed at the turn of events.

Mrs. Kitty would like to be involved in every facet of the cats' welfare, from feeding, to veterinary care, to reproductive control; yet she realizes that the most important thing is to reach out to the people of Guangfu, to address their concerns and to show them what benefits her service will introduce to the entire community. Without that respect, she would surely incur resentment and suspicion: "This woman cares more about cats than people!" Moreover, she knows that it is beyond her ability to induce everyone to love cats.

Building this kind of trust takes time. Before Houdong ever was a media sensation, Mrs. Kitty was making the rounds, chatting up the neighbors so as to make friends. On these early trips she didn't even bring food to feed the cats; her purpose was to reassure the locals that she was there to assist, not to instigate or criticize. Only with a foundation of mutual trust firmly in place could things proceed.

Author Chu Tien-hsin fed stray cats for 10 years. She used to traverse the breadth and length of Taipei, borough by borough, preaching the gospel of TNR-"trap, neuter, return." But by 2010, after four years of pushing the policy and after over NT$3 million in public expenditure, only 1,765 cats had been successfully sterilized. Taipei still had an estimated 11,000 cats roaming the streets, and Taiwan as a whole had more than 300,000. Stabilizing the population required 70% sterilization, light years beyond anything the government had achieved up to that point.

According to research conducted overseas, TNR as a strategy has not lived up to expectations. Cats possess an uncanny knack for self-preservation. They seem to know that their posterity is in jeopardy, and so they run faster, produce more offspring. Call it instinct, perhaps. Or maybe it's just nature achieving balance.

Chu and other animal conservationists consistently encounter the same criticism: Why worry about cats when people are starving? Certainly your efforts would be better spent assisting human beings?

"If I can't muster any sympathy for the hapless creatures that I see every day, how I am I supposed to worry about poverty and starvation, which are far more abstract, let alone do something about them?" she replies.

The power of anthropomorphism

"I don't hate people just because I love cats," says Chu, drawing a firm line.

Mrs. Kitty approaches things differently. Neither melodramatic nor extreme, she is active, sunny and upbeat. She uploads photographs of the cats to her blog, gives them names and recounts their exploits, all the while supplying emotional underpinning to lend it real human drama. The cat actors project a contagious hilarity, earning them the affection of many followers on the Web, most notably young people, as well as cat lovers and photography buffs.

The web response was greater than anything she could have expected. All of the sudden, people were taking trips to see the cats of Houdong in person, with some even sticking around as volunteers. Momentum continued to build to the point that the Houdong Cat Lovers Society page on Facebook had more than 3000 members.

The combination of volunteer muscle, coordination via the Web, and cooperation from local residents has resulted in two successful events: a cat photography exhibition in September, 2009 and the Kitty Cleanup Extravaganza held on October 31 the same year. Scores of participants flooded through the train station. One thousand volunteers came together to clean and sterilize the feline dwelling while the media provided coverage. In the history of Taiwan tourism, never before had there been a cat-centered event.

The volunteers maintain a credo that the less money spent on an event, the greater will be the resultant creativity and emotional impact. In March of 2010 featuring the cats (of course) and pinwheels, the volunteers didn't have a budget for the pinwheels-that was left up to the event's participants, who brought their own.

Of course the dollar still has its use. In order to raise funds to pay the veterinary expenses of sick cats, at Mrs. Kitty's direction they began selling postcards featuring illustrations made by one of the volunteers, as well as developing other related products. They also set up a donation box at the entrance to Guangfu.

In 2010, one of Mrs. Kitty's photographs won the "Golden Cat Award" in a competition in Japan's Tashiro Island (also renowned for its cats). Her victory was covered in the Japanese press, bringing her personal fame, and beyond that, exporting Houdong Cat Village's fame to people beyond Taiwan's shores.

In the wake of her success in Japan, she published a book, Houdong Cat Talk, in which she introduced the "four kings" in detail. Black Nose, much beloved on account of his pleasant disposition, unfortunately died from an injury caused by a fish bone before the book was published. The Cat Lovers Society and the community residents decided to honor him by erecting a statue.

Bringers of fortune

Just what kind of wealth can one cat create? Consider the case of Tama, the famous eight-year-old calico cat that was appointed stationmaster of Kishi Station on the Kishigawa Line in Wakayama, Japan. Her fans flock in from miles away, bringing in a yearly total of ¥1.2 billion. You've seen the cat figurines in the stores that beckon in wealth? Well, this one broke the mold.

Love is the reason behind it all, though. People love dogs, cats, and furry things because they reinforce our connection to nature.

"However human beings treat the cats, the cats will reciprocate in turn. If you treat someone with kindness, even if they bear you some ill will, they're more likely keep it bottled up. If you treat the cats with affection, they will respond with love. Of course, sometimes people pretend to be affectionate in order to gain an advantage, but it is often the case that, after a while, the act becomes real," says Mrs. Kitty.

As time passes, though she feels the pressure of all the work she's undertaken, she's noticing a gradual change in the cats. People's friendly treatment has brought out a more personable side in them. Moreover, the cleanup efforts of the volunteers have won over many previously indifferent residents who have taken an interest in touching up their dilapidated homes.

Not everyone in Guangfu has welcomed the changes that are unfolding gradually but forcefully. There are still plenty of squalid vistas, and the newly elected borough chief has made it clear that he wants "nothing to do with this cat business." Then there are the pervasive rumors of mishandling of the kitty donation box, and the elderly man who is convinced that the bites on his grandson's feet are the work of pests that have profited all too well from the large cat population.

There's also the problem of abandoned cats. Mrs. Kitty monitors from afar the events in Cat Village via surveillance equipment, and just recently they caught a father attempting to dispose of his son's pet cat by dumping him in Guangfu.

The Houdong Cat Lovers Society has achieved a consensus that the Houdong locals are not to be treated as pawns, and their dirty laundry is not be aired, lest the community feel slighted and their image compromised. "We told the residents that cats really are fleabags, and that cleared up a lot of misgivings right then and there. We do our best to accentuate the positive and let it trump all the criticism and recrimination. We have to be careful about the purity of our motives-the residents aren't blind, after all-they can see that whether or not our actions are genuine," says Mrs. Kitty.

All creatures great and small

"We want Taiwan to have a place like Greece, where cats can live a carefree existence, where they needn't panic at the slightest approach of a human being. Where they can sunbathe in the day and roam about at night. I thought it would take years for such a place to emerge; who would have thought that Houdong would pave the way." These words are taken from a blog entitled "Mythic Ruins."

Houdong is leading the way by becoming a unique "cat village" tourist destination. Unlike the organic processes that gave rise to Milos Island in Greece and Japan's Tashirojima, the Houdong phenomenon was born gradually out of the naive goodwill of the volunteers and the kindly tolerance of the locals-the kind of grassroots development that no government planning can possibly bring about.

In Mrs. Kitty's broad experience as a cat photographer, there isn't a place in Taiwan-or anywhere else in the world, for that matter-that rivals Houdong in terms of the feline temperament. The cats have experienced such kindness that they gladly return it to human visitors. They seem extraordinarily poised and calm, to the point that administering vaccinations, ordinarily an odious task, is an absurdly easy one. In the winter, a cat or two will press up against a human visitor for warmth. Amidst the bustle of human traffic, they'll sprawl themselves out belly-up on the stairs and drift off into contented snores.

The tourist atmosphere is a uniquely friendly one. Cats, it turns out, are great at breaking down barriers between people. Oftentimes tourists will begin chatting with one another, and before long, it seems as though they've known each other a lifetime.

It is a place rich in life lessons. Observing the interaction of the cats, their lives and deaths, makes us more sensitive to the suffering of the less fortunate living amongst us.

Indeed, India's great sage Gandhi once said: "The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated." Based on how visitors treat the cats, Mrs. Kitty is convinced that Taiwan is a place of elevated morals whose citizens have the utmost respect for life, and that the spate of animal torture cases some years back was an anomaly.

Though small, Houdong could be described as a microcosm of Taiwanese society as a whole. But Houdong's experience would be impossible to duplicate elsewhere. To achieve a marketing tour de force in a small town requires that they uncover that which sets them apart from everyone else.

Houdong has taken the first steps towards Mrs. Kitty's vision of a cat theme park, replete with a cat shrine where visitors can pay their respects to the feline spiritual guardians, a street with vendors selling treats-not the usual Taiwanese fare of fried chicken, oyster pancakes and noodles, but dorayaki, the red-bean pancake that was the fatal weakness of Japan's most famous cartoon cat, Doraemon, which would better underscore the cat connection. She hopes that locals lead the way-it wouldn't be fair for outsiders to muscle their way in and steal the profits away from deserving longtime residents.

One woman and her supporters have changed the face of a small village, inspiring it to achieve great things. This woman's love for the land and its inhabitants, both human and feline, has launched a great saga of service and dedication that will continue to unfold.

相關文章

近期文章

繁體中文 日文

喵喵喵,拚觀光猴硐貓街似天堂

文‧蘇惠昭 圖‧莊坤儒

沒落的煤礦小村落,原是途經九份的「偶然」,現在因為貓的駐足成為遊客的「必然」。「貓天堂」的吸引力為什麼這麼大?


「時代真正變了!」陳阿伯吁了長長一口氣。

陳阿伯猴硐人,但他對外從不說自己來自猴硐,免想也知無幾人聽過猴硐,聽過瑞三煤礦,講到嘴乾也沒用。所以阿伯名片上印的住所是九份,反正猴硐、九份隔壁鄰居,差一點點路,全台灣沒有人不知道九份的。

可是現在他把九份改回猴硐了,還三不五時就對人說,很多遊客是專程來猴硐看貓,「順便」彎去一下九份。不止台北人,高雄、屏東來的都有;不止台灣人,日本人、韓國人、美國人也都來了。

到猴硐看貓

風水輪流轉,時代真的不一樣了,陳阿伯這樣告訴貓博士夫人簡佩玲。

因為丈夫林政毅是北市中山動物醫院院長,所以原來是鋼琴老師的簡佩玲稱自己「貓博士夫人」,簡稱「貓夫人」。

台鐵侯硐站王站長也是見證人,2009年起,兩年多來他每天平均迎接六百名遊客,假日則超過千人,這是過去的十倍之多。2006年有部落客寫「猴硐旅記」,說這座彷若無人的山城「詳和寧靜」,是「一個被遺忘的小鎮」。2007初春時分,貓夫人從網路上得知猴硐貓群,為了拍攝貓,她踏進猴硐,那是猴硐命運非比尋常的一天。

四年過去,2011年4月中旬,平常的一天,北台灣從漫長的冬天甦醒,猴硐特有的稀有鐘萼木花初開,貓夫人背著Pentax 645D來到猴硐。

她現在是專業的攝影師了,先找站長商談寵物用品公司希望在鐵道旁牆面張貼衛教資訊事宜,再疾步走過掛滿風車的狹長天橋,那是唯一通往猴硐光復里的路,進入光復里,每幾步便有讓人看了會心一笑的標語立牌,如「不建議帶狗來訪」、「我怕閃燈」、「常有貓出沒」,還有散見四處可愛精巧小木屋,伴隨群貓度過猴硐溼冷的冬天。

猴硐現有貓口約五十隻,公貓雖多有抓去結紮,但仍有漏網之魚,有幾隻母貓正懷孕中。屋頂、階梯、破窗、花圃、草叢,乃至人家擺在家門口的斗笠裡,到處都有貓。

昔日礦坑,今日歷史

繁華褪盡化廢墟,這是許多礦區的共同命運。

昭和四十年,在日本福島常磐鎮,有一礦坑老闆突發奇想,把廢棄礦區改頭換面為「夏威夷休閒渡假中心」,並從東京聘請老師來教導村子裡的女孩跳草裙舞,這故事後來被拍成電影《扶桑花女孩》。

猴硐如果是一部電影,那麼它講的就是一個關於夢想如何啟動的故事,以廢棄礦坑、基隆河上游和四面環繞的山為舞台,貓群和光復里居民是當然的主角,「自己演自己」,貓夫人和猴硐貓友社志工出錢出力出任熱血導演,遊客呢,既是觀眾,也是臨時演員吧。

林政毅最常虧老婆說這是「一個傻瓜帶著一群傻瓜」的冒險。

如果從台北搭開往宜蘭的區間火車,過了瑞芳,就是侯硐站,行車時間不到一小時。根據《瑞芳鎮鎮誌》,侯硐里以侯硐庄得名,相傳該里第七鄰後一座懸崖上有一個小洞,曾為猴群棲息處,故名「猴洞」。「猴洞」煤產量台灣第一,全盛時期有住民兩、三千人。礦工不喜歡礦坑內有水,遂改「洞」為「硐」。1961年政府以不雅為由,去掉「猴」的犬字邊;1991年地方文史工作者尋根溯源,推動「還我原名」;2005年當時的台北縣(新北市)議會通過把「侯硐」恢復為「猴硐」,但隸屬交通部的火車站還是叫「侯硐」,後面加括號(猴硐),也是一景。

導演吳念真在猴硐大粗坑長大,日復一日望著父親潛入礦坑勞動的背影,一直到得矽肺病。他拍的《多桑》,取景之地就是猴硐。

煤礦走入歷史,歷史啟動觀光,2010年夏天新北市觀光局規畫的猴硐煤礦博物園區開幕,吳念真出任觀光親善大使,第一件事就是明確昭告「猴硐不止有貓」。

貓與人的現實拉鋸戰

但是,如果沒有貓,單單煤礦博物館、運煤橋、日本神社、金字碑古道,那是不可能帶來人潮的,觀光局明白,站長明白,在鐵道旁賣小吃的阿英也明白,大家多是為了看貓而來。

貓夫人第一次到猴硐拍照,貓並不親人,人一靠近就跑,搖著尾巴警戒著。第二次再來,她卻被宛如十萬大軍的貓陣搶食光景嚇到差點跌倒。光復里社區因為封閉,這裡的貓便得天之獨厚,生存在一個沒有汽車威脅的所在,因街貓多死於「車禍」,平均活不過兩年。

光復里人去樓空,長住社區的居民大約有四、五十位,多是阿公阿嬤。前任里長周晉億和妻子吳梨花都愛貓,每天煮飯時都把貓的「配額」一起算進來,後來鼎鼎有名的「流鼻涕」、「黑鼻」、「麒麟尾」、「大頭」這「四大天王」就是他們家養的貓。其他無人認養的貓,也會有一些阿公阿嬤固定用剩飯剩菜餵食。

沒有天敵加上不會餓肚,光復里四大貓群從個位數繁衍到近百隻,終於社區出現異聲,貓夫人來到猴硐之前景況便是如此。

從最基本的餵食貓糧到醫治病貓、結紮,貓夫人很想為光復里的貓做一些事,導入正確觀念給社區,但她也明白,成事關鍵在人,不先去關心光復里居民的感受,讓他們感覺被尊重,舉出他們可能得到的好處,光是談貓、貓、貓,一定碰到「人不如貓?」的反彈,更何況,她不能強迫每一個人都喜歡貓。

這需要時間的磨合。在媒體用「爆紅」報導猴硐之前,貓夫人三天兩頭地「泡」在猴硐,用「閒閒開講」的方式,和居民「搏感情」,她甚至沒有當下就帶飼料來餵食。她必須讓居民真心感覺,這女人是來「協助」而不是「糾正」、「指責」,在這個互信的基礎上展開行動。

作家朱天心餵養街貓數十年,在台北市,她一個里一個里的去宣導TNR(捕捉、結紮、釋放)。但TNR試辦四年以來,到2010年,花費公帑三百多萬元,只結紮了1,765隻,台北市粗估有一萬一千多隻街貓,全台灣則超過30萬隻,距離能夠達到控制貓口的70%結紮率相去甚遠。

根據國外研究,TNR效果不如預期,乃是當貓敏銳地意識到「絕子絕孫」威脅逼近,便逃得越快,生得越多,這是動物本能,也是大自然的平衡之道。

而朱天心,以及所有動保人士最常被質問的是:到底貓重要還是人重要?有力氣救貓,為什麼不先去救助窮人,地球上還有那麼多人吃不飽?

「因為,我害怕若自己一旦對日日觸及的弱小動物都不能感同其情,如何能對更抽象的貧窮、飢餓、幼童能心動心軟並付諸行動?」朱天心回應。

說故事力量大

無力者出力,競爭有限資源,這是台灣動保界的現實,很多動保界人士走到最後,面對流浪貓狗的悲慘命運,很難不變成激進派與憤世者,有人甚至為此傾家盪產,心力交瘁,最後家破人亡,如一個人獨力照顧上百多隻狗的退休老師賈鴻秋、洪秀惠。極少數人承擔了絕大多數人的「共業」,以及政府必須負的責任。

「我,不能因為愛貓而憎恨人類,」朱天心畫出了底線。

貓夫人走另一條路,不悲情,不激進,正面積極,陽光歡樂,她把在猴硐拍到的貓照片逐一放上部落格,給牠們取名字,說故事,傾訴心情,擬人化的貓個個成了很搞笑的喜劇演員,這很吸引年輕人,因為感染力超強,這個部落格很快成為人氣部落格,一網打盡愛貓人與攝影人。

網路的驚人威力遠超過貓夫人的預想,透過部落格,開始有人到猴硐看貓,其中有一些人留下來成為志工,發展到後來便在「臉書」上組成猴硐貓友社,目前社友已突破三千人。

透過志工的力量和網路的串連,加上居民的首肯,猴硐人都記得2009年9月「有貓相隨,猴硐最美」攝影展和10月31日的「貓掌清潔日」,一波一波湧進車站的人如潮水,有千名志工進入社區進行大掃除、消毒環境,還有媒體,這是在台灣觀光史上,從來沒有過的「貓奇觀」。

志工都抱持一個信念:「越沒有經費,越能激盪創意,做出來的活動越動人。」2010年3月的「貓風趣」活動,志工沒錢購置風車,乾脆請參與者「自己帶風車來」。

但還是需要新台幣。為了替生病的貓籌錢治病,在貓夫人主導下,志工貓小P開始畫插畫,發行明信片,開發周邊產品,光復里入口也擺了一具捐款箱。

2010年貓夫人的一幀貓照片獲日本田代島攝影比賽金貓賞,上了報紙的頭版新聞,隨著貓夫人成為「台灣之光」,猴硐貓村更是發光發熱,名氣飄洋過海,不只在台灣了。

之後貓夫人出版她的第一本書《猴硐貓城物語》,鄭重介紹「四大天王」,因為好性情而成為明星貓的黑鼻卻沒有等到書出版就被魚刺刺傷致死,貓友社和社區居民為了紀念牠,決定為牠樹立雕像。

現在,一走出侯硐車站,遊客一眼就看見的頭頂大盤帽,被追封為全台首位「貓列車長」的180 公分Q版雕像,就是黑鼻老大,這也意味著公部門對「民間」、「私人」猴硐貓村的認可。仙去的黑鼻成了猴硐的守護神。

招財貓的奇蹟

一隻貓可以創造多大的產值?日本和歌山電鐵株式會社經營的貴志川線,自任命親和力超高的八歲玳瑁三色貓小玉為貴志站站長後,不辭千里來看牠的粉絲絡繹不絕。一年創造十二億日圓產值,真正是一隻「招財貓」。

但這一切的源頭還是愛,理論上人類是愛貓愛狗的,從牠們身上我們便與自然有了聯繫。

「當人的態度改變,貓也會改變;當你釋出善意,對方如果不爽,想罵,也會吞回去。當你對貓有了感情,就會付出愛,當愛投射出去,有回應過來,就會感到快樂。當然有人因為得到利益,裝作有感情,但是感情裝久了,也會變成真的。」

時光流逝,「雖然壓力大到像一座山」,貓夫人一點一點看到猴硐人和貓緩慢的改變。因為被和善對待,貓變得親人;因為志工來大掃除,有幾戶人家,從無所謂到主動打掃破落的家園。

當然不是每一個人都欣然接受光復里的轉變,這裡髒亂破敗還是處處可見,新上任的里長對貓事擺明了「和我無關」,有關捐款箱的謠言滿天飛,阿公抱怨孫子腳上的紅豆冰都是因為太多貓;周太太對假日遊客的嘻鬧聲、踩上人家屋頂拍照的行為有點意見,有一個星期天她從瑞芳買菜回家,行經天橋,因為人多路狹,雞蛋都被擠破了。

棄養野貓也是一大問題,現在光復里已裝上多具監視器,貓夫人從遠端監控,不久前就揪出了一個把孩子的貓帶到光復里丟棄的父親。

猴硐貓友社一直有個共識,就是不能把當地居民當作棋子,也絕不講負面的事情,以免傷害社區,也壞了猴硐形象。「我們告訴居民,其實貓是跳蚤的吸塵器,誤會就解開了;我們儘量放大好的那一面,用正面去蓋過批評和攻擊。我們做了什麼,我們是不是為了獲得什麼利益才來,社區的人有眼睛,都會看,行動說明一切。」

維護形象並不容易,有關猴硐貓村,貓夫人強勢採取由她「統一發言」,也以「私人社區」為由刻意不讓動保團體進到猴硐。

獨特的生命教育經驗

「一直很希望,台灣有個地方像希臘,貓,可以自在隨意的生活;遇見人,不用像驚弓之鳥地慌張躲藏。白天,自在的晒太陽;夜晚,精神奕奕的出沒。一直都以為,台灣還要過很久才有可能出現這樣一個地方,卻沒想到,猴硐跨出了第一步。」這段文字出自「廢墟迷思」部落格。

猴硐成了全世界獨一無二用「貓」來做觀光行銷的「貓村」,不同於希臘貓島、日本田代島的自然天成,猴硐貓村是一個傻瓜帶著一群傻瓜,然後在居民的包容和合作下一小步一小步打造出來的。

以貓夫人到處看貓拍貓的經驗來看,台灣,乃至世界也沒有一處貓村的貓像猴硐貓,因為被和善的對待,特別親人、特別有安全感,施打預防針出奇順利,冬天時會一隻、兩隻的疊在遊客身上取暖;人來人往中,有些貓根本就大剌剌翻過身,肚腹全露仰躺在階梯上呼呼大睡。

恐怕這也是獨一無二的「觀光現象」,遊客和遊客之間,會因為貓而打破冷漠,攀談起來,彷彿認識了很久。

這裡也是生命教育的現場,透過觀察貓,與貓的互動,貓的生病與死亡,進而促發對弱勢族群的同理心。

印度聖雄甘地說,「一個國家的強盛與道德程度,可以從其對待動物的態度來判斷。」從遊客對待貓的態度,貓夫人認為台灣人「素質很高」、「懂得尊重生命」,血淋淋的虐殺事件並不能代表台灣。

猴硐雖小,卻也是台灣社會的縮影,但猴硐經驗也是無法複製的,有心行銷地方,每一個村里、社區就必須找出屬於自己的「猴硐貓」。

而跨出第一步的猴硐,貓夫人描繪了一個「貓藝術村」的願景,譬如建設讓觀光客帶著朝聖心情而來的貓神社,街上賣的小吃,不要鹽酥雞、蚵仔煎、蚵仔麵線,而是諸如「貓的銅鑼燒」之類能夠連結到「貓」的相關產品。她希望都由當地人來做,得之於地方用之於地方,「外地人來開,就死定了。」

一個人可以帶動一群人,改變一個村子。一個小村子,可以做大大的事。因為愛這塊土地,愛猴硐社區,也愛貓,貓夫人,這一個傻瓜帶著一群傻瓜的冒險故事,恐怕也不只是一部電影,而是一齣必須一直努力下去的連續劇。

炭鉱の街から猫の街へ ――猴硐;の猫天国を訪ねる

文・蘇惠昭 写真・荘坤儒

没落した炭鉱の村だが、九份;への道筋に当るという偶然から始まり、猫の溜り場として必然的に観光客をひきつけるようになった。猫の天国とは、観光客にとってそれほど魅力的なのだろうか。


時代は変ったと、陳伯父さんはため息をつく。

陳伯父さんはこれまで、猴硐;出身と人に言ったことはなかった。猴硐;とか瑞三炭鉱とか言っても、知る人もいなかったからである。そこで名刺に刷った住所は九份;、どうせ猴硐;は九份;の隣で、ちょっと先に過ぎないし、台湾で観光地の九份;を知らない人もいないからだ。

ところが、今では九份;を猴硐;に戻して、人にも言うようになった。観光客の多くが猴硐;まで猫を見に来て、ついでに九份;まで足を伸ばすのである。台北、高雄、屏東から、さらには台湾だけに止まらず、日本、韓国、アメリカからやってくる人もいるという。

猫に会いに猴硐;へ

運命は回り、時代は移る。陳伯父さんは、猫博士夫人の簡佩玲にこう語った。

夫人のご主人の林政毅が台北市中山動物病院の院長だったので、ピアノの先生の簡佩玲は猫博士夫人、略して「猫夫人」と自称している。

台湾鉄道侯硐;駅の王駅長も、この運命の移り変りを目の当りにしてきた。2009年以降になると、毎日600人を超える観光客が駅に降り立ち、休日には1000人を超える。以前の10倍の乗降客である。2006年に「猴硐;旅行記」があるブログに載った時、この静かで穏やかな山間の町は忘れられた町と称されていた。2007年の春、猫夫人は偶然にネットで猴硐;の猫集団を知り、猫の写真撮影のために猴硐;を訪れた。これが猴硐;の運命の転換点である。

それから4年、2011年4月中旬になると、北台湾は長い冬からようやく目覚め、固有種のブレッシュネイデラの花が開き始める。猫夫人は手になじんだPentax645D を担いで、また猴硐;にやってきた。

彼女は今ではプロの動物カメラマンで、まずは駅長と鉄道脇の塀に衛生教育の広告を出したいペット用品会社の希望を相談した。それから早足で風車が一杯に設置された長い歩道橋、光復里への唯一の通り道を渡って行った。光復里に入ると、数歩毎に「犬連れはご遠慮ください」「フラッシュは苦手です」「猫が出入りします」などと思わず微笑みたくなる標語が立っている。あちこちに小さな猫小屋が置かれていて、寒く湿った猴硐;の冬を過ごす猫の避難所となっている。

猴硐;の猫人口は約50匹で、オス猫は去勢手術されているものが多いが、それでも漏れがあったのか、妊娠中のメス猫もいる。屋根、階段、窓、花壇、草むら、家の門口の蓑笠の中にさえ、猫が蹲っている。

かつての炭鉱、今日の歴史

かつては繁栄を誇りながら、歴史の流れとともに没落し廃墟と化すのが、炭鉱の町に共通する運命である。

昭和40年、福島県いわき市の炭鉱の社長は、廃鉱を作り変えてハワイアンセンターを作ろうと思いついた。そこで東京から先生を呼んで、町の女性にフラダンスを教えこみ、ハワイアンセンターの呼び物としたのだが、この物語が後に映画「フラガール」となった。

猴硐;がもし映画になるなら、それは夢の実現の物語であろう。基隆河の上流と山に周囲を囲まれた廃鉱の町を舞台に、猫と光復里の住人が主役となって、素のままを演じ、猫夫人と猴硐;の猫愛好家ボランティアたちが監督、助監督を勤めて協力し、観光客は観客兼エキストラとなろう。

林政毅はそんな妻を、大の猫好きが猫好きグループを率いていると評する。

台北から宜蘭行きの鈍行に乗って1時間ほど、瑞芳駅を過ぎると猴硐;駅である。「瑞芳鎮の歴史」によると、侯硐;里は侯硐;庄から名をとったという。侯硐;里第七鄰の後ろの断崖に小さな洞窟があり、サルの群れが住み着いていたので、猴洞の名がついたという。猴洞はかつては台湾屈指の炭鉱で、最盛期には人口が2、3千人に上っていた。炭鉱夫は坑道の出水を嫌うので、洞から「さんずい」を取って硐;に変えた。1961年に、政府は文字の見た目が上品ではないとの理由で、猴の字の「けものへん」を取ってしまった。それが1991年になって地方の文化関係者が地名の起源を探り、旧名回復運動を起した。2005年に当時の台北県議会は侯硐;を猴硐;に戻す決議を可決したが、交通部に属する鉄道の駅は今も侯硐;で通し、わざわざ後ろに括弧で(猴硐;)と注記している。

映画監督の呉念真は猴硐;の大粗坑炭鉱で育ち、毎日父が坑道に入っていく後姿を、父が塵肺となって倒れるまで見続けた。その撮影した映画「多桑(父さん)」のロケ地は、まさに猴硐;であった。

炭鉱が歴史となると、今度は観光の時代が始まる。2010年夏に新北市観光局は猴硐;炭鉱博物パークをオープンし、呉念真が初代観光親善大使に就任し、まずは猴硐;は猫だけではないと、宣伝に努めた。

猫と人の現実

しかし、炭鉱博物館や産業遺跡、日本時代の神社、金字碑古道だけで、肝心の猫がいなければ、これほどの観光客は呼べないのである。それは観光局も、駅長も、鉄道の傍で軽食を売る英さんもよく分かっている。観光客はまさに猫を目当てにやって来るのである。

猫夫人が最初に猴硐;に猫を撮りに来たとき、猫は人が近づくと逃げ、尻尾を振って警戒していた。それが二回目になると、猫の大軍に囲まれて、餌を取り合う光景に驚かされた。一般的には多くの猫が自動車事故で命を落とし、野良猫の平均余命は二年に満たない。しかし、光復里は外から自動車が乗り入れられないので、猫にとって自動車に脅かされない安全な場所なのである。

光復里は人口が流出し、長く住んでいる住民は40人ほどである。前里長の周晋億と妻の呉梨花はどちらも猫好きで、毎日食事になると猫の分も用意していた。その後、有名となった「洟垂れ」「黒鼻」「麒麟尾」「大頭」の四天王はその飼い猫であった。他の野良猫たちにも、おじさん、おばさんたちが残り物をやっていた。

天敵はいないし、餌には困らず、光復里の猫は100匹近くまで増加した。増えすぎると、地域に反発が生れだしたのが、猫夫人がやってくる直前の猴硐;の状況だった。

餌やりから病気治療、去勢手術まで、猫夫人は光復里の猫に正しい扱いを取り入れたかったが、それには住民が鍵となることを彼女はよく知っていた。猫、猫と騒いで猫ばかり大事にすれば、住民の感情を重んじない、人より猫が大事なのかと反発されるだけである。第一、猫を好きになれと他人に強要することもできない。

これには時間がかかる。マスコミに猴硐;が取り上げられ、注目を集めるようになる前は、猫夫人は猴硐;に足を運んで住民と世間話に時間を費やした。この女性が住民を批判したり、不備を指摘するのではなく、協力しようとしているという信頼関係を築き、そこから行動に移らなければならない。

作家の朱天心は町猫に餌をやって数十年努力を続け、地域ごとに猫の去勢手術を行うことを提唱している。しかし、この運動を始めてから4年で300万台湾元余りの公的資金を費やしたが、手術できたのは1765匹に過ぎない。台北市だけで1万1千匹の野良猫、町猫がいると言われ、台湾全体では30万匹を超えるというが、猫の数を抑制できると言われる去勢率70%には、まだ程遠い。

国外の研究では、去勢の効果が上がらないのは猫が危険を感じて逃げてしまって繁殖を続けるからとされているが、それも大自然の本能であろう。

こうした運動を続ける朱天心や動物保護運動家はしばしば、猫が大事なのか、人が大事なのか、猫を助けるだけの力があるなら、貧しい人を助けたらどうかと言われる。

そういった問いに「私が一番恐れるのは、日常接触する小動物への同情心を失ったら、さらに抽象的な貧困や飢餓に苦しむ子供たちには感情移入できなくなるだろうということです」と朱天心は答える。

物語の力

有限の資源を奪い合うというのが、台湾の動物保護運動の現実である。多くの動物保護運動家は野良猫や野良犬の悲惨な運命を目の当りにし、世に怒って過激な行動に走り、時に財産を使い果すこともある。多くの人と共同でプロジェクトを進めて、政府が負うべき責任を求めていける活動ができる人はごく少数なのである。

猫を愛するからといって、人を憎むわけにはいかないと、朱天心は一線を引く。

猫夫人は、そんな朱天心とはまた別の道を行く。怒ったり過激に走ったりせず、真正面から明るく楽しく活動する。猴硐;で撮った猫の写真をブログにアップし、名前をつけて、物語の形式で猫の気持ちを訴えかける。擬人化した猫は、それぞれが芸人となって若い人の気持ちをひきつける。このブログは人気ブログとなって、猫好きも写真好きも呼びこんだ。

ネットの驚くべき影響力は猫夫人の予想をはるかに超えるものであった。猴硐;の猫に会いに行く人、ボランティアを始める人、さらにはフェースブックで猫友クラブが組織され、現在の会員は3000人を超えている。

ボランティアの力とネットとが結びつき、さらに猴硐;の住民の協力があって、2009年9月に「猫と暮らす美しい猴硐;」写真展のイベントが盛大に行われた。写真展と10月31日に行われた猫のクリーンデーに、千人を超えるボランティアが地域の大掃除を行い、台湾観光史上かつてない猫の奇観を作り上げたのであった。

ボランティアたちは資金がなければアイディアで、楽しい活動ができると信じており、2010年3月の猫風車イベント「猫風趣」でも、風車を設置する金がない人たちも、自分で風車を持って参加した。

しかし、それでも経費は必要である。病気の猫の治療費を調達するため、ボランティアの一人は猫の絵を描いて絵葉書やグッズを開発し、また光復里の入り口に募金箱を置いた。

2009年に猫夫人の猫写真が日本の第二回田代島にゃんフォトコンテストで金猫賞を受賞し、新聞一面に掲載された。そのおかげで猴硐;の猫コミュニティの知名度が高まり、海外にも知られるようになった。

その後、猫夫人は『猴硐;猫城物語』を出版し、四大猫を紹介した。しかし、四天王のトップで気のいい黒鼻は魚の骨を詰まらせて、出版を待たずに逝去、猫友クラブと地域住民は人気猫を記念して、その彫像を立てることにした。

猴硐;駅を出ると、大きな駅長の帽子を被った黒鼻の彫像を見ることができる。現在は猴硐;の守護神である。

招き猫の奇跡

猫がどれほどの経済効果を上げるのだろうか。日本の和歌山電鉄が経営する貴志川線では、八歳の三毛猫の「たま」が駅長に就任してからは、ここを訪れる観光客が絶えず、1年の経済効果12億日本円と正真正銘の招き猫となった。

これはすべて愛情の奇跡である。人間は基本的に猫や犬が好きで、そこに繋がりを求める。

「人の態度が変ると、猫も変わります。猫に愛情を伝えると猫からも愛情が返ってきて、幸せな気持ちになります。そこに利益があるから、愛情がある振りをする人もいますが、それが続くと本物の愛情に変ります」と猫夫人は語る。

時が流れ、最初は大きな圧力を感じた猫夫人も、猴硐;の住民の気持ちが少しずつ変るのを感じている。優しくされると、猫も人懐っこくなる。ボランティアが掃除をするようになると、住民も態度が変わる。

無論、誰もが光復里の変化を歓迎しているわけではない。新任の里長は、猫のことは自分とは関係ないと言うし、観光客が多すぎてうるさいと嫌う人もいる。

捨て猫の問題も持ち上がっている。光復里には多くの監視カメラが設置され、子供の飼い猫を捨てに来た父親が突き止められたことがある。

猴硐;の猫友クラブでは、一つの共通認識がある。現地住民を利用せず、地域に不利となることを行わず、猴硐;のイメージを損なわないことである。「猫は蚤を撒き散らすのではなく、吸い寄せてくれると話します。よい面を強調して批判や攻撃をカバーし、地域のために何をするか、行動を見てもらうのです」と言う。

猴硐;の猫村では、猫夫人が代表窓口となり、動物保護団体が随意に進出するのを許さないことにしている。

独自の生命教育

「台湾にギリシャのように、猫が自由に暮らせる場所を作りたいと願っていました。一日中逃げ隠れして暮らすのではなく、昼間はのんびり日向ぼっこでき、夜はあちこちに猫が出没できる、そんな場所は難しいと思っていたのに、猴硐;にあっさり実現しました」とブログに記された。

猴硐;が世界でも珍しい、猫を観光にする猫村となったのは、ギリシャのミコノス島や日本の田代島のように自然の成行きからではなかった。猫好きのグループが猫好きを呼び寄せ、住民の寛容と協力があって、一歩ずつ作り上げたものである。

猫夫人の猫観察と猫撮影の経験から言うと、台湾あるいは世界のどこでも、猴硐;の猫のように可愛がられて人懐こい猫はいないそうである。猴硐;の猫は安心しきっており、予防注射も簡単に打てる。冬になると、一匹二匹が観光客に寄り添って暖を取るし、暖かい季節には階段にお腹を出して、ひっくり返って眠っている。

これこそが独自の観光の景観だろう。観光客も猫を介して会話が弾み、打ち解けあう。

ここは生命教育の現場でもある。猫を観察し、語り合い、その病気から死まで見つめることで、弱いものに対する共感が生れる。

インドの聖人ガンジーはかつて「一国の強さとその道徳の水準は、動物に対する態度で判断できる」と語ったことがある。観光客の猫に対する態度を見ると、猫夫人は台湾人もレベルが高く、生き物を大切にしていると安心する。時に耳にする動物虐待事件だけが、台湾を代表するものではない。

猴硐;は小さな町だが、台湾社会の縮図でもある。それでも猴硐;の経験は、どこにでもコピーできるものではない。一つの町にそれぞれの「猴硐;の猫」を見出さなければならない。

その第一歩を踏み出した猴硐;において、猫夫人は猫のアートビレッジの夢を描いている。観光客がお参りに来るような猫神社であるとか、屋台などで売る軽食もよくあるような鳥のから揚げではなく、猫のどら焼きといった猫を思わせる商品にしたいのである。それを現地の人が作り、地産地消を推進したい。よそ者がやってきたら、おしまいである。

一人の人が一つのグループを呼び寄せ、一つの町を変えていく。小さな町でも大きなことを成し遂げられる。それはこの土地を愛し、猴硐;という地域を愛し、猫を愛しているからである。猫夫人という猫好きが、猫好きのグループを率いたこの活動は、一本の映画ではなく、これからもずっと続く連続ドラマでなければならない。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!