A Street Magazine for the Age of Fools-- Fines Lee and The Big Issue

:::

2011 / 7月

Wang Wan-chia /photos courtesy of Hsueh Chi-kuang /tr. by Geof Aberhart


"The Big Issue! $100 a copy!" Since last spring, you may have noticed this catchcry amidst the bustle around Taipei's MRT station exits. Or maybe you've spotted the orange-vested, ID-badged sellers, waving the latest issue high in the air.

The Big Issue, originally from the UK, launched a Taiwan edition in April 2010, packed with articles from professional journalists and authors. But what stands out most about the magazine is how it's sold-the sales-people are all homeless, and out of each issue's cover price of NT$100, NT$50 goes to the publisher to cover costs, with the remaining NT$50 going to the seller him- or herself.

By combining a unique business model with a means of helping the less fortunate, The Big Issue (TBI) has become a model social enterprise, operating to provide a social good rather than simply to make a profit. Now that TBI Taiwan has just celebrated its first anniversary, what kind of challenges have they faced, and how has the model fared in Taiwan, where social enterprise is still a fairly unknown thing?


It is a fine Friday morning in summer, and 48-year-old Li Long-zhu is looking at his schedule. First, he has to head to TBI's distribution center at Tai-pei's Hua-shan Creative Park to pick up the latest issues, and then push his cart full of magazines to the plaza in front of Shin Kong Mi-tsu-ko-shi, across from the Tai-pei Railway Station. As he makes the trek, he thinks to himself, "This issue's not been out long, and with the weekend coming up, that should make for some good sales today!"

Li Long-zhu, originally from Yun-lin, dropped out of high school at 14 to find work. At 20, he married a mainland Chinese woman and moved up to Taipei. Together they had two children, and while his wife was a fulltime housewife and mother, Li worked pressing clothes for a garment factory in Wanhua.

That was back when Taiwan's clothing industry was booming. Orders were piling up, and he and his colleagues were making NT$5 for each garment they pressed. He worked 10-plus hours a day, making NT$50,000-NT$60,000 a month with ease-his personal best was making NT$110,000 one month.

A wanderer's path

But then the garment factories began moving to mainland China to make the most of the lower labor costs, and in 1999 Li Long-zhu suddenly found himself out of work. He went door-knocking, looking for work, but all he could find was odd jobs washing dishes and moving cement. In the end, his wife could no longer take the financial strain, and headed back to the mainland with their two children in tow.

Having already lost his job and his marriage, three years ago things got even worse for Li. Unable to afford rent, he had to sleep in underpasses by night and wander the streets by day, occasionally getting work holding advertising signs or helping with temple festivals. To feed himself, he would make the long trek to a branch of Grace Home, which offers food for the homeless, lining up with other homeless people to get a meal, and worried that if he were too late, he'd get nothing.

When he heard last year that TBI was looking for salespeople, he signed up immediately, becoming part of the magazine's vanguard. He works almost all year, in the heat of summer and cold of winter, only not heading out on rainy days. He is out on the street selling magazines for an average of 10 hours a day, generally selling about 20 copies a day, enough to meet basic living expenses.

In his second month working for TBI, he was able to rent a small studio apartment for NT$4000 a month, finally making his deepest wish come true-bringing an end to over two years of homelessness. Now, he just hopes he can keep working selling magazines, saving money to one day go visit his son and daughter in mainland China. Every part of his life, from lifestyle to how much he values his own life, has been transformed by TBI.

"By giving these homeless people a chance to become self-sufficient, we also help them rebuild their self-confidence and self-respect," says TBI's Taiwan editor-in-chief Fines Lee.

According to figures from the International Network of Street Papers, there are 112 publications in 40 countries using the same model as TBI, offering homeless people the opportunity to stand on their own two feet, and with a 20-year history in the UK, TBI and its various international editions is both a leader and the best known.

Teach a man to fish....

In 1991 Gordon Roddick-husband of Dame Anita Roddick, founder of British body care product chain The Body Shop-was inspired by a street magazine called Street News, sold by homeless people on the streets of New York. Working together with John Bird, who had experience with publishing and had been homeless himself, he created The Big Issue.

Building on the credo that it is better to give a man a hand up than a handout, the pair built up a network of homeless street vendors, as well as developing a system of recruitment and training for their vendors. This offered job opportunities to vagrants and the underprivileged, helping them take another step toward finding housing, getting back into touch with people, and rediscovering their self-confidence and self-respect. From there, they could once again become productive members of society, say farewell to homeless life, and then even look for more stable work.

Over the following years TBI grew gradually, and in 1995 The Big Issue Foundation was set up, with the aim of helping TBI vendors establish secure housing and get access to healthcare, as well as expanding TBI services to include vendors left unemployed due to disabilities.

In 1996, the first overseas edition of TBI was set up in Australia, and today editions are published in 10 countries, including Ireland, South Africa, and Japan. Taiwan was the ninth country to join TBI's ranks.

In each country, the local fundraisers must first apply for a license from TBI in the UK, which gives them the rights to the name, although the local editions are independently published. The content varies greatly from place to place, and local editors are free to decide on their own articles, including the option of getting articles from other editions translated.

The British edition of TBI has already moved from monthly publication to weekly, with a weekly circulation of 136,000 copies, and has an estimated weekly readership of 640,000, based on copies being shared around. So far, TBI has helped as many as 10,000 homeless people turn their lives around, becoming a leader in social enterprise in the UK.

Going offline

The chief executive and editor-in-chief of the Taiwan edition of TBI, Fines Lee, got his start in the world of the Internet.

Now 41 years old, Lee graduated with a degree in physics from Tung Hai University, and in 1997 he became a founding staff member at Taiwanese website Kimo (which has since been purchased by Yahoo!), working on Kimo News and user interface design.

Later he moved on to the then-embryonic GigaMedia, before leaving and once again proving to have an eye for a trend and business opportunity by founding auction site Downput, which would later become Roodo Market. In 2004, when Kimo Auctions began asking sellers to pay a listing fee, unsatisfied users made the move to Roodo, helping it rocket to the top of the pile.

Riding this new wave of popularity, Roodo transformed to become a primarily blogging-focused site. In 2008, Lee also established Roodo Magz, working with a couple of dozen professionals living abroad to publish articles on lifestyle, culture, art, design, and other global hot topics, complete with in-depth criticism.

Earning praise for its graphic design and in-depth content, Roodo Magz also went on to win the Click Awards, the most respected awards in the Chinese-language online world.

In 2009, one of his friends asked Lee if he would be interested in branching out into the print media. At roughly the same time he happened to hear about the history and model of TBI in the UK, and he was intrigued. Lee decided to start out in the same vein, going from an old hand at the Internet to a newbie in the publishing world at a time when the print media were under threat.

Lee flew to London in November 2009 to visit TBI's head office and meet with John Bird, bringing with him information on homelessness in Taiwan, Taiwan's available social welfare resources, and Taiwan's public transportation systems, as well as a plan for the kind of content he hoped to publish. Tapping his personal network, he was even able to get famous graphic designer Aaron Nieh to draft six possible covers for the first issue.

Impressed by Lee's preparedness and professionalism, Bird happily gave him the go-ahead, asking Lee to get started as soon as he could. Bird even waived the licensing fee, but also said he could only offer his experience, not any kind of financial or manpower assistance.

After getting back to Taiwan, Lee immediately set about getting TBI Taiwan going, raising NT$2 million from friends and family to cover start-up costs.

A unique sales approach

In his initial efforts to find vendors, Lee visited organizations that work with the homeless, including the Spring of Living Water in Wan-hua, Grace Home, and Ze-nan Homeless Social Welfare Foundation, holding seminars there to introduce the magazine and its business model. Those that were interested in following up could go on to seminars on sales methods and practical training sessions, then head out to sell magazines on a trial basis.

As with the UK model, before vendors can go out and sell magazines, they must sign a code of conduct, which includes prohibitions on smoking, drinking, selling other products, or accepting extra payments beyond the magazine's cover price while working. Lee explains that the code of conduct aims to both train a respect for work and differentiate TBI from other social welfare and charitable organizations.

To start off, TBI provides 10 copies of the magazine to new vendors, and when those are sold, they can then restock according to how much money they have and how well the magazines have been selling.

In addition to letting vendors decide where they will sell the magazines each day from a list of available locations, along with when they will work, TBI also allows the vendors to decide whether or not they'll work on a given day, whether they want to take a short break for emotional or health reasons, and even if they want to com-pletely quit selling magazines. Virtually every element of vendors' work is under their own control.

As Lee explains, many homeless people have various odd jobs that they may do, and this, coupled with their unstable living conditions, means TBI can't put them under too many restrictions, otherwise things might backfire.

According to official figures, there are some 500-600 homeless people in the Greater Taipei area; however, more pessimistic estimates place the number somewhere above 1,000.

In the year that The Big Issue has been on sale in Taiwan, 120 people have at some time been vendors, and after starting with 18 vendors, today the number currently working is already up to 50. Vendors come and go-some manage to escape homelessness, find stable work, and return to mainstream society; others drop out of the job for various reasons. A high rate of vendor turnover is common amongst TBI operations wherever they are.

The Taiwanese edition of The Big Issue has sold 30,000 copies a month, averaging over 200 copies per vendor. Almost 10 of their vendors, though, are selling 600-700 copies a month, making for a monthly income of over NT$30,000.

The way Lee sees it, sales figures are directly related to how committed the vendors are, with pedestrian traffic in their chosen areas only a secondary consideration. If a vendor doesn't show up often, people wanting to buy the magazine will be left empty handed, and so naturally sales will turn in favor of the more regular, long-term vendors.

An anthem for the Age of Fools

Taiwan's The Big Issue covers a broad range of topics, including global issues, arts and culture, green philosophy, business and technology, and other areas. The target demographic is members of the so-called "Generation Y."

The inspiration for the cover of the April Fool's Day 2010 issue, which featured "The Age of Fools" in Chinese with a large font, came from Apple founder Steve Jobs' 2005 commencement address at Stanford, which he closed by exhorting the students to "Stay hungry, stay foolish."

Fines Lee, who considers himself a member of Generation X, says that Generation Y, who grew up with the Internet, is now the largest demographic in Taiwan, and they generally have the guts to innovate, pursue what they want, and approach the world with their own set of values. To him, Generation Y embodies what Jobs meant by "stay foolish," being motivated by ideals and imagination rather than tradition and dogma, and that this will surely bring forth a surprising and colorful future.

At the same time, this generation have grown up in a time of massive consumerism and information overload, so TBI aims to keep things simple and focus on the core ideal of "staying hungry, staying foolish," presenting a "wise fool's" perspective on the world.

And as John Bird himself said about the founding of TBI UK, social enterprises are still businesses-they sell products, not pity. As a result, the magazine still needs to be competitive, attractive to readers, and capable of standing up against commercial magazines.

TBI's editorial policy has been controversial in the UK and US, especially when compared with the content of similar street magazines.

One school of thought maintains that TBI is too commercialized, aping commercial magazines by frequently featuring celebrities like Angelina Jolie and Paul McCartney rather than really getting to grips with issues relating to the homeless and underprivileged. The other side argues that such commercialization helps sell magazines, which is key to both long-term success for the magazine and helping the homeless earn an income.

A convenient channel?

Facing an initial lack of vendors and experience, when TBI Taiwan launched, Lee made a bold decision in order to build a name for the magazine. He had 100,000 copies of the launch issue printed-some of which still remain in inventory-and chose to follow in the footsteps of the UK edition, which was put on shelves in 200 branches of The Body Shop, organizing to have them put on shelves in 7-Elevens outside the Greater Taipei area.

He explains that when a magazine launches, it naturally needs to build up a name, and by having it on sale outside of Tai-pei they could get the magazine into the hands of readers outside of Tai-pei, in areas where there were no street vendors. On top of that, there was no cannibalization of business by having them in convenience stores and being sold by street vendors. TBI even made an arrangement with 7-Eleven that after expenses were taken out of the price, 7-Eleven would donate the remainder of the cover price to organizations that help the homeless through the United Way system.

Quickly this approach aroused questions from people online, who wondered whether this inconsistency with TBI's operations elsewhere was a betrayal of the magazine's founding spirit.

To address these concerns, and after looking at the costs and benefits of stocking the magazine in convenience stores, after two short months Lee decided to end the arrangement, and from June 2010-issue three-the magazine was no longer available in 7-Eleven. Instead, TBI attempted to set up arrangements with social welfare foundations in central and southern Taiwan in an effort to expand street vendor presence to those locations. However, with a production staff of only six people, it was decided that due to issues with publishing and distribution, this was unfeasible. It wasn't until May 2011 that vendors began selling the magazine outside of the Tai-pei area, setting up in Tai-chung. There still remains a lot of room for growth in terms of getting the magazine out around the island, however.

Media with a mission

Although TBI was founded with the aim of providing a social good, it's still a business, and has to strike a balance between business and social concerns. In its early days, they focused on building a solid editorial and vendor foundation, then once profits were sufficient, they founded the The Big Issue Foundation, a non-profit organization responsible for providing vendors with training, as well as working on raising funds to provide greater services to the homeless. Such foundations have been founded in four to five years of operation in the countries where TBI has been most successful, including the UK, Australia, and Japan.

Looking back over TBI Taiwan's progress over the past year, Fines Lee laughs that he never really considered the whole "saving the world" part of things, instead being more interested by the challenges of getting the magazine up and running. And despite the difficulties he's faced in this effort, Lee remains as wholeheartedly dedicated as ever.

"Thank god for The Big Issue!" says Li Long-zhu. Having faced his share of hardships, Li can't help but feel grateful: "I can't imagine a job that's more welcoming or heartwarming than this," he says with a smile. "When people buy magazines from you, they'll even smile and give you encouragement." And with that, Li Long-zhu turns around and gets back to work as the sun beats down. "The Big Issue! $100 a copy!"

相關文章

近期文章

繁體中文 日文

愚人世代的 街頭雜誌── 李取中與《THE BIG ISSUE》

文‧王婉嘉 圖‧薛繼光

「大誌雜誌!一本一百!」自去年春天起,或許你曾在熙來攘往的捷運出口,瞥見這群身著橘色背心,掛著識別證的販售員,正兜售手中高舉的雜誌。

這本源自英國,名為《The Big Issue》的雜誌,去年4月起發行台灣版,也多了個中文名字《大誌》,由專業記者、作家編寫雜誌內容;最特別之處,在於這份刊物的通路,僅限無家可歸的街頭流浪者販售,每本售價100元,販售員每賣出一本,即可得到50元收入,另外50元則歸雜誌社所有,做為內容生產成本。

結合商業模式與照顧弱勢的《The Big Issue》(TBI),以「社會企業」為定位,意指將營運所得用於追求社會目的,而非私人營利的經營型態。台灣版《TBI》創刊至今已屆滿週年,實際運作情形如何?對於社會企業概念仍十分模糊的台灣來說,又將帶來什麼刺激與挑戰?


夏日晴朗的週五上午,48歲的李隆柱展開每日例行行程,先到《TBI》位於華山園區裡的發行站進貨補書,再拉著推車,一路走到台北車站新光三越百貨前的廣場開張營業,他心想:正值月初發刊不久,加上週末假期將至,今天生意應該不錯。

家住雲林的李隆柱,14歲國中還沒畢業就得出外討生活,20歲與大陸籍妻子結婚北上後,接連生了兩個孩子,老婆在家當全職主婦,他則在萬華成衣廠熨燙衣服維生。 

彼時正值台灣成衣產業的顛峰榮景,訂單爆量,工資以燙一件衣服5元計算,他每天早出晚歸,工作十多個小時,一個月掙個5、6萬元不成問題,最高紀錄甚至曾月入11萬元。

流浪者之路

之後,因中國大陸低廉人力的強勢競爭,大量成衣工廠外移,李隆柱也於1999年底一夕失業,隨後求職處處碰壁,只能靠洗碗盤、搬水泥等零工糊口,妻子最終也不堪經濟壓力,帶著兩個孩子搬回大陸。

歷經失業、失婚的他,3年前更是窮途末路,再也付不出房租,只能每天晚上睡在地下道,白天四處遊蕩,偶爾做些廣告舉牌、廟會出陣頭等臨時工,或大老遠徒步至提供貧寒者用餐的恩友教會,和其他街友一同排隊領飯吃,若晚了還會吃不到。

去年得知《TBI》徵求販售員的消息後,李隆柱立刻報名加入,成為第一批的元老成員。除了雨天之外,幾乎全年無休,不論酷暑寒冬,平均每天在街頭站上10小時,一天約能賣出20本雜誌,收入維持基本生活無虞。

在加入雜誌販售的第二個月起,他就在市區裡租了一間4,000元的雅房,終止兩年多的流浪生活,此刻最大的心願,則是希望能繼續賣雜誌,好存錢到大陸探望一雙兒女,對他來說,從生活方式到生存價值,都因《TBI》而迎來巨大轉變。

「我們透過提供街友自食其力的機會,重建個人的信心與尊嚴,並重新取回生活的主導權,」台灣版《TBI》的關鍵推手、總編輯李取中說。

據國際街報聯盟統計,目前全球共有112份刊物於40個國家以相同模式發行,提供街頭流浪者自力更生機會,其中最知名及具指標地位者,當屬在英國已有20年歷史,發行版圖遍及全球的《The Big Issue》。

給魚吃,不如給釣竿

1991年,以天然、環保為特色的英國保養品牌「美體小舖」(The Body Shop)合夥人羅迪克,在美國紐約受到街頭販售的《Street News》啟發靈感,返回英國後,便找了具有印刷出版經驗,同時也曾經是無家可歸者的友人柏德,共同創辦《The Big Issue》。

「與其伸手要,不如舉手賣,」是《TBI》創立的核心宗旨,他們建立一套遊民銷售通路,並透過召募、訓練販售雜誌機制,提供遊民與弱勢族群工作機會,讓他們能進一步取得住所,重新接觸人群,找回自信、生存尊嚴後,能再與社會接軌,告別流浪生活,另覓穩定工作,形成正向循環。

《TBI》在英國逐漸獲得廣大迴響,並於1995年成立「The Big Issue基金會」,服務對象擴及因殘疾而無工作能力的街友,服務內容也拓展至街友的棲身住所、健康醫療等全方位照護。

1996年,澳洲成為《TBI》海外發行的第一站,迄今已於愛爾蘭、南非、日本等10國發行,台灣為第九個加入的國家。

各國版本皆為當地籌辦團體主動向英國《TBI》提出授權申請,共用名稱,但編務獨立,形式內容各不相同,可自行決定,也可互相翻譯文章使用。

目前英國《TBI》已由月刊成長為週刊,發行量達13萬6,000份,若以傳閱率計,每週則超過64萬名讀者,至今已幫助1萬名無家可歸者扭轉命運,在英國更是居領導地位的社會企業。

網路新貴轉戰

台灣版《大誌》執行長兼總編輯李取中,原是網路人,在數位世界戰果輝煌。

59年次的他,東海大學物理系畢業退伍後,1997年搭上網路崛起的黃金列車,成為奇摩網站(今「雅虎奇摩」)創始員工,負責奇摩新聞及使用介面設計。

之後轉戰草創時期的和信超媒體,又看準網路拍賣熱潮與商機,與友人一同創業,成立「當鋪網」(之後更名為「樂多市場」),當2004年奇摩拍賣爆發向賣家收刊登費,引發網友不滿的風波時,樂多便趁勢攻下一席之地。

隨後因應使用者風潮,樂多轉型為以部落格空間為主要服務。李取中也於2008年創辦「樂多新文創線上誌」網站,與20~30位人在國外的專業寫手合作,提供生活文化、藝術設計等領域的全球觀點與深度評論。

其版面設計與紮實內容大獲好評,曾奪下華文網路世界最具代表性的「網路金手指」大獎。

2009年有朋友詢問李取中,是否有意跨足實體雜誌出版,約莫同時,他偶然得知英國《TBI》的歷史背景與發行模式,深感興趣,決定以此為起點,在紙本出版式微的年代,仍毅然地從網路老手成了一名出版界新兵。

2009年11月,李取中飛往倫敦《TBI》總部與創辦人柏德見面,他帶著台灣遊民分布、大眾運輸系統、現有社福資源等資料,以及規劃中的雜誌內容,並動用人脈,請來知名平面設計師聶永真,為創刊號設計六款封面初稿。

柏德對其有備而來的專業架勢印象深刻,欣然同意,只說了句「Go ahead!」,要李取中放手去做,不需支付任何授權費用,但也直言僅能提供經驗分享,無法提供金錢或人力等協助。

自英國返台後,李取中即馬不停蹄地展開台灣版《TBI》的前置工作,向親友籌資200萬元,做為創業成本。

獨特通路:街友販售員

首先為招募販售員,李取中在台北的活水泉、恩友、人安等遊民關懷團體舉辦說明會,宣傳雜誌概念及運作方式,有意願者可再參加第二階段的銷售技巧說明、實際狀況演練,便能開始上街頭實習販售。

正式上街販賣前,比照英國模式,販售員需簽署一份行為守則,包括販售時不得抽菸、喝酒、販賣雜誌以外的物品,也不能接受民眾超額付費等。李取中解釋,這些行為守則是表現對工作的尊重,也點出社會企業與慈善事業的差異之處。

一開始,《大誌》會免費提供十本雜誌予新手販售員,雜誌賣完後,他可依自己的財務狀況、銷售情形,決定要再補多少本新書。

而包括每天駐點販售的時間,今日開張營業與否,或因情緒與健康因素想短暫休息數月,甚至不想賣了都可隨時退出,一切端看販售員的自由選擇。

李取中說,街友多半有多重而臨時的工作,加上他們長期處於不穩定的狀態,若給予太多限制,只會徒增反效果。

依官方統計,大台北地區約有500~600名街友,若再加上隱性數據,估計總數超過1,000位。

《大誌》創刊一年多來,共有120位街友曾參與《TBI》販售計畫,現職販售員人數,也從最初的18位,陸續增至目前的50位。街友來來去去,有人擺脫遊民身分,找到穩定的正職工作而回歸社會,也有人覺得實在做不來而退出,高流動率亦是全球《TBI》共同面臨的常態。

台灣版《大誌》發行量3萬本,銷售員每月平均銷售量約為兩百多本,但其中也有十來位每月銷售量在600~700本之間,月收入可達3萬元以上。

李取中分析,銷售情況與販售員願意投入耕耘的程度息息相關,地點的人潮多寡反倒是其次,若販售員不常現身,常讓特地依駐點資訊前去購買的讀者撲空,生意自然就轉向駐點時間長、現身頻率固定的販售員。

愚人世代頌歌

台版《TBI》定位為綜合性的人文雜誌,內容包含全球議題、藝術文化、綠色思潮、商業科技的綜合報導與評論,並鎖定25~35歲的「Y世代」為目標讀者群。

選在去年4月1日愚人節發行的創刊號,封面上頭大大寫著「愚人世代」,靈感來自於蘋果電腦創辦人賈伯斯2005年在史丹佛大學演講時的結尾:「Stay Hungry, Stay foolish(求知若飢,虛心若愚)」。

X世代的李取中說,在網路時代成長的Y世代,是目前國內人口比率最高的一群,他們多勇於創新、追求自我,有其獨特的價值觀。在他眼中,Y世代即是一群「大智若愚」的愚人,其想像力與為理想而前進的動力,將會為未來增添許多繽紛的驚喜。

同時,Y世代生長於物質豐裕的年代,消費選擇目不暇給,資訊爆炸超載,因此《TBI》以「Stay Hungry, Stay foolish」為核心理念,傳達無論外界紛擾吵雜,仍得切記時時回歸本質,以最單純的心態看待世界的「愚人」精神。 

而如同柏德在英國《TBI》創刊時所言,社會企業販賣的是產品,不是憐憫與同情,因此雜誌也需具備可看性及競爭力,與市面上一般商業雜誌較勁。

與國際間其他以遊民書寫或遊民政策議題為主的街頭刊物相比,《TBI》的編輯策略也曾在英美兩地引起討論爭議。

一派意見認為其版面精美、內容過於向大眾文化靠攏,並不時請來安潔莉娜裘莉、保羅麥卡尼等好萊塢名人、搖滾明星登上封面,擬仿商業雜誌的做法,遊民參與程度低;反之,也有支持者認為《TBI》讓街友獲得實際收入,又找到雜誌能長久經營的成功之道,相得益彰。

李取中舉例,若是一杯標榜公平貿易的咖啡,卻又貴又難喝,消費者起初或許會以「愛心、慈善」為理由,姑且上門一試,但不足以讓顧客長期買單,而既然以創造街友收入為目標,內容自然得以能否引起讀者購買興趣為優先考量。

比較各國《TBI》版本,仍以時事、社會議題、藝文娛樂資訊為共同主軸;而每期約80頁的台灣版《大誌》,則參考英國知名雜誌《MONOCLE》,內容分為國際時事、商業科技、文化、設計、編輯精選等五大主題,至今則有張惠妹、伍佰、陳綺貞等國內流行樂名人躍上封面,也有部分廣告支援收入。

與超商通路合作的兩難

礙於台版《TBI》人力、經驗不足,初期街友通路建立不易,但為打響名號,李取中看似冒險地大膽印製10萬本創刊號(至今仍有庫存),除了大台北地區由販售員販賣之外,台北以外的縣市,因尚未布建街友銷售網絡,則仿傚英國版初期曾在200家美體小鋪上架模式,台灣版也在「7-Eleven」便利商店上架販售。

李取中解釋,新雜誌創刊,需要宣傳推廣,也希望台北以外的讀者若因網路資訊、媒體報導對《大誌》感興趣,至少先有初步接觸管道,而超商與街友販售地區並無重疊,沒有互搶生意之虞。在超商賣出的雜誌,原歸販售員收入的50元,《大誌》則與7-Eleven協議,扣除超商上架成本後,再由7-Eleven統一捐給聯合勸募,並指定以街友關懷團體為捐款對象。

不料,此舉一出,網路討論聲浪不斷,有網友質疑,這與《TBI》在全球標榜的街友通路不一致,是否仍能顧及原始精神?

面對外界疑惑眼光,以及考量於便利商店發行的高成本與效益,僅實驗短短兩期後,自去年六月發行第三期起,就取消於7-Eleven上架販售,改與中南部的街友社福體系聯繫,尋求資源以能持續拓點,但因《大誌》團隊僅有6人,仍需顧及平日的編務及發行業務,遲至今年5月,才在台中新增駐點販售員,而全台仍有許多銷售空間待拓展。

「柏德有來信表示鼓勵,他說在便利商店上架不一定不好,雖然他們當時在英國的嘗試並未奏效,但至少你試過一次,清楚知道自己在做什麼,沒有忘記理想的初衷,」李取中說。

是媒體,也是社會企業

《TBI》從社會企業的理念出發,但仍有媒體經營的營收平衡問題。全球各地的《TBI》發展初期,雜誌社因必須兼負編務與建立街頭販售者通路的工作,多在站穩腳步、有足夠盈餘後,就另外成立「TBI基金會」,希望以非營利組織模式獨立運作,分擔販售員的培訓工作,並對外募款,將所得用於更廣泛全面的街友服務,以運作最成功的英國、澳洲、日本為例,都是《TBI》在當地創刊4~5年後,才成立基金會。

目前台灣版《大誌》營收僅能勉強打平,成立基金會還是個遙遠的夢想,李取中的想法是,先從每月發行一次,逐步增加發刊頻率(改為每二個月發行三期),以讓販售員能提升收入為短期目標。

回想創刊一年的過程點滴,李取中笑稱自己並非抱著濟世濟民的崇高理想,只是對「發行台灣版《TBI》」這個挑戰,懷抱高度熱情與好奇,即使過程困難重重,還是想要用盡全身力氣促成。

「感謝大誌,有大誌真的很好!」走過一段顛簸人生道路後,販售員李隆柱不禁感嘆,「天底下找不到一個工作比賣大誌還溫馨,客人買完雜誌,還會面帶笑容地幫你加油,」他笑著補充說道。語畢,他轉身上工,炎陽下的身影繼續高喊,「大誌雜誌!一本一百!」     

ホームレスが販売するストリートマガジン―¢苻p版ビッグイシュー

文・王婉嘉 写真・薜継光

「大誌雑誌、一冊百元」と、去年の春から地下鉄の駅で、オレンジのベストに識別証を掛けた販売員が雑誌を販売しているのを見かけるようになった。

この雑誌はイギリスから始まったThe Big Issue(TBI 、ビッグイシュー)の台湾版で、去年4月から中国語名「大誌」で発行された。記事はジャーナリストや作家が書くが、最大の特色は流通で、販売員をホームレスに限るところである。一冊100元で、一冊売ると販売員に50元が入り、50元が雑誌製作に当てられる。

ビジネスとしてホームレスを支援しようというこの雑誌発行事業は社会的企業と定義され、営利目的ではなく社会目的に利益を運用するものである。台湾版ビッグイシューは創刊から1年を迎えたが、運営状況はどうなのだろうか。社会的企業の概念がいまだに曖昧な台湾で、どのような作用を起し、またその課題はどこにあるのだろうか。


晴れた夏の金曜の朝、48歳の李陸柱は毎日お決まりのコースで、華山にある大誌雑誌の発行所で雑誌を仕入れ、ワゴンを押して台北駅前の新光三越デパート前の広場で営業を開始した。月初めの発売日から間もなく、週末を控えて売行きが期待できる。

雲林県出身の李陸柱は、中学卒業前の14歳で働きに出た。20歳で中国大陸出身の妻と結婚してから台北に出て、二人の子供をもうけた。妻は主婦で家におり、彼は万華の既製服工場でアイロンかけの仕事をしていた。

当時は台湾の既製服産業の最盛期で、受注で一杯だった。アイロンかけの賃金は服1点で5元、朝から晩まで10数時間働き、月収5〜6万元を稼ぎ、最高で11万元にもなった。

ホームレスへの道

その後、既製服工場は人件費の安い中国大陸に移転し、李陸柱は1999年末に失業した。その後の就職もままならず、皿洗いやセメント工事などの臨時雇いで糊口を凌いでいたが、妻は貧窮に耐え切れず、子供二人を連れて大陸に戻ってしまった。

失業に離婚が加わり、3年前には家賃も払えなくなった。やむなく毎晩地下道で眠り、昼間はあちこち歩いて、ビラ配りや祭りの手伝いなどのアルバイトで稼いだ。また遠くまで歩いて、ホームレス向けの炊き出しに並ぶが、並ぶのが遅れるとそれにもあぶれる。

去年になってビッグイシューの販売員募集を知り、李陸柱はすぐに応募した。雨の日以外はほとんど毎日街角に立ち、暑さ寒さに関らず10時間以上販売した。一日平均して20冊を販売し、必要最低限の収入を得られるようになった。

雑誌販売に参加した翌月に、市内に4000元の部屋を借り、ついに2年あまりのホームレス生活に終止符を打った。今の最大の希望は、雑誌を売り続けてお金を貯め、大陸にいる二人の子供に会いに行くことである。その生活も生きる価値も、すべてがこの雑誌で大きく変わった。

「私たちはホームレスに自立できる機会を与え、自信をとりもどさせたいのです」と、台湾版ビッグイシューの李取中編集長は話す。

現在、世界40ヶ国で112種類の出版物が似たようなモデルで発行されており、ホームレスに自立の機会を与えている。中でも最も知名度が高いのが、イギリスで20年の歴史を有し、発行地域が世界各国に及ぶ「The Big Issue」なのである。

魚より釣竿を与えよ

自然原料と環境保護を特色とするイギリスの化粧品ブランド、ザ・ボディショップの創設者ロディックは、1991年にニューヨークの街角で販売される新聞「Street News」に感銘を受けた。イギリスに戻ってから、かつてホームレスで、しかも出版経験がある友人と共同で「The Big Issue」を創刊した。

「手を伸ばして乞うより、手を上げて売ろう」が雑誌創刊の主旨で、ホームレスを募集し、販売訓練を行ってこれを流通経路とし、雇用を創出しようというものである。ホームレスはこれにより住む場所を確保し、人との触れ合いをもち、自信を持って生きられるようになる。さらには社会とつながり、ホームレスから抜け出して、安定した仕事を見つけるという、良い循環が生れる。

同誌はイギリスで支持を広げて、1995年にはThe Big Issue財団法人が設立され、障害があって働けないホームレスを対象に、医療や住む場所の世話などを始めた。

1996年、イギリス以外では最初にオーストラリアが加わり、現在ではアイルランド、南アフリカ、日本などの10ヶ国で発行され、台湾は9番目の発行地域となった。

各国のバージョンは、イギリスのビッグイシューから名称使用のライセンスを受けるが、編集は独立しており、互いのコンテンツを翻訳して使用できる。

イギリスのビッグイシューは月刊誌から週刊誌になり、発行部数は13万6000部に達する。読者数は64万を超えると見られ、現在では1万人以上のホームレスの運命を変えて、イギリスを代表する社会的企業となった。

ネットからの参戦

台湾版の「大誌雑誌」の李取中編集長は、もとはネットのデジタルな世界で活躍していた。

1970年生れの彼は、東海大学物理学科を卒業し兵役を終えてから、1997年にネットの黄金時代を経験し、奇摩ネット(現在のヤフー台湾)の最初のメンバーとなり、ユーザーインターフェースをデザインした。

その後、草創期の和信超媒体(ギガメディア)に参加し、さらにネットオークションに目をつけて、友人と当舗網(後の楽多市場)を創設する。2004年に奇摩ネットオークションが売り手から手数料を徴収したことで問題となったとき、機に乗じてシェアを拡大した。

その後、ユーザーのネット利用の変化に応じ、楽多市場はブログを主要サービスに転換していく。2008年には楽多新文創オンライン雑誌を創設し、数十人の海外ライターと協力し、生活文化や藝術などのジャンルを主に、グローバルな視点の評論を掲載した。そのレイアウトや内容が好評となり、中国語ネットで最も権威ある「網路金手指」賞を受賞したのである。

2009年に、ある友人が実体雑誌を出版する気はないかと打診してきた。同じ頃、偶然イギリスのビッグイシューの発行モデルを知り、実体雑誌を発行するならこれだと、印刷媒体の衰退する時代に、ネットから出版に参戦した。

2009年1月に李取中はロンドンに飛び、ビッグイシュー本部で創設者のジョン・バードに面会した。台湾のホームレス分布、交通システム、現行の社会福祉などの資料と、企画する雑誌や創刊号のカバードラフトなどを見せた。

バードは周到に用意されたプロの仕事に感銘を受け、ライセンス費用は要らないから、すぐにやるようにと言ってくれた。但し、経験は教えるが、金銭や人的援助はしないと言われた。

イギリスから帰り、ただちに雑誌の出版準備にかかり、親戚知人から200万元を集めて、創業の資金とした。

ホームレス販売員

まず、販売員を募集した。李取中は活水泉、恩友、人安などのホームレス支援団体と説明会を開催し、雑誌の主旨と運営方法を説明した。興味がある人は、次の販売技術の説明会と実際のシミュレーションに参加し、街頭での販売実習を受けることとなる。

正式に販売を開始するには、イギリスに倣って販売時の酒やタバコ、雑誌以外の物品販売、チップなどの受取を禁止する行動規範に署名する。行動規範は仕事への尊重を促し、社会的企業と慈善事業の違いを示すところでもある。

最初は無料で10冊を提供し、それが売れたら自分の懐具合や販売状況を見て、どれだけ仕入れるかを決める。一日の販売時間、営業するかどうか、あるいは長期休業するか、すべて自分で決める。

ホームレスは臨時雇いの仕事を抱えていることもあり、また長期的に不安定な状態にいたので、あまり制約を加えると、逆効果になると李取中は言う。

統計によると、台北には500から600名のホームレスを数えるし、さらに潜在的なデータを加えると、総数は1000名を超えると見られる。

大誌雑誌創刊から1年余りで120人のホームレスが参加し、現職の販売員は当初の18人から50人に増えた。ホームレスから抜け出して安定した職につく人、続かない人と、入れ替わりが激しいのも、世界に見られる共通の現象である。

台湾版ビッグイシューの発行部数は3万部で、販売員一人当りの販売部数は600〜700部、月収は3万元以上になる。

李取中によると、販売員の努力と販売実績は正比例し、販売地点の人通りの多さはあまり関係しないと言う。販売員が姿を見せないと、読者は空振りとなるので、自然と必ずその場にいる確率が高い販売員のところに買いにいくからである。

愚かな世代の精神

台湾版ビッグイシューは総合的な文化雑誌と位置づけられ、芸術文化やグリーン思想、グローバルな課題を総合的に論じ、また対象を25〜35歳のY世代にフォーカスしている。

去年4月1日のエイプリル・フールに発売された創刊号の表紙に愚かな世代と書かれている。これはアップル創設者ジョブスが2005年にスタンフォード大学で行なったスピーチの最後の言葉「ハングリーであれ、愚かであれ」から来ている。

X世代の李取中にとって、ネット時代に成長したY世代は人口比率が一番多く、独自の価値観を持っている。Y世代は知恵ある愚か者で、その創造力と理想が前進のエネルギーになる。

また豊かな時代に情報があふれる中で育ったY世代には、「ハングリーであれ、愚かであれ」の理念、世間の喧騒に惑わされずに物事の本質に帰り、単純な気持ちで世界を見る愚者の精神が重要なのである。

またイギリスでビッグイシューを創刊した時に、バードは社会的企業が販売するのは憐れみや同情ではなく商品であって、雑誌も市場の一般誌と肩を並べる面白さや競争力がなければならないと語っていた。

各国で発行されるホームレス関係のその他の出版物と比較して、ビッグイシューの商業的な編集方針が時に英米で議論を引き起こしてきた。美しい印刷で大衆に迎合するような内容、時にハリウッドの有名人やロック歌手が紙面を飾るのは商業的に過ぎて、ホームレスを語ることが少ないというのである。その一方、賛同者はこの編集こそがホームレスに実質的な収入を確保し、雑誌の長期的経営を可能にすると言う。

李取中に言わせると、フェアトレードのコーヒーが高くてまずければ、最初は慈善を理由に我慢して買ってくれても長期的な顧客にはならない。ホームレスの収入確保が目的なら、内容は当然読者が買ってくれることを優先しなければならない。

各国のビッグイシューを比較すると、時事、社会問題と文化芸能情報が主軸である。台湾版も時事、文化、ビジネスなどを主軸に、張恵妹などの有名人が表紙を飾り、広告収入もある。

コンビニでの流通の問題

台湾版ビッグイシューは経験と人手の不足から、ホームレスによる流通がなかなか確立できず、大胆に10万部を刷った創刊号の在庫が残っている。そこで台北以外の地域ではセブン-イレブンでの販売を決めた。

台北以外の読者に雑誌を提供するためもあって、ホームレスの販売と重ならない地域のセブン-イレブンに置いてもらうことにしたのである。販売員の収入となる50元は、店での販売経費を控除した金額を、セブン-イレブンからホームレス支援団体へと用途を指定して寄付するということにした。

ところが、これがネットで議論を呼び、ホームレスによる販売という雑誌の理念と異なるという批判の声が上がった。その結果、この実験はわずか2号分で中止され、台湾中南部の販売は現地のホームレス支援団体と連絡して流通経路を広げることにした。今年5月になって、ようやく台中に販売員を置くことになったが、販路拡張の努力はまだまだ続く。

メディアの社会的企業

ビッグイシューは社会的企業ではあるがメディア経営の採算問題は変わらない。世界各地でも創刊当初は、編集とホームレス販売員の確立に苦労する。経営が安定してから財団法人を立ち上げ、NPOとして販売員の訓練や募金を担当し、ホームレスに、より全面的なサービスを提供する例が多い。

台湾版ビッグイシューはようやく収支均衡したところで、財団法人設立はまだ夢である。まず月刊を2ヶ月3号発刊に増やして、販売員の収入を底上げするのが短期目標である。

創刊当初のあれこれを思うと、決して世のためという高い理想からではないと李取中は笑う。当初は台湾版ビッグイシューの発行に挑戦しようという情熱だけだったのが、その難しさから全力を注ぎ込まざるを得なかったのである。

「大誌雑誌のおかげです」と人生の辛酸を味わってきた李陸柱は言う。「大誌雑誌売りほど温かい仕事はありません。買ってくれるお客は、にこにこと励ましてくれます」と話しながら再び雑誌売りに戻った。炎天下に、その声がまた響く。「大誌雑誌、一冊百元」と。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!