The Idea Guy: “Starch King” Chuang Chien-mo

:::

2012 / 12月

Lin Hsin-ching /photos courtesy of Chuang Kung-ju /tr. by Phil Newell


In August of 2012, the Bangkok Starch Industrial Company—a venerable firm founded with Taiwanese capital—won the highest honor available for export-oriented industries in Thailand: the Prime Minister’s Export Award. The reason is that the company exports 83% of its total production, while its raw materials are 100% “made in Thailand.” Company revenues are about 150 million Thai baht per month (about NT$142 million), and the firm is said to be one of the country’s most valued in terms of foreign exchange earnings and job creation.

The man who leads this company, its very heart and soul, who has created unprecedented new business opportunities in an economic sector that is far from sexy, is Taiwanese businessman Chuang Chien-mo—aptly nicknamed “the Starch King.”


Is it really so easy to make money selling starch? “Our company produces hundreds of tons of ‘white powder’ each day, so from my point of view it’s hard to imagine anyone not making money by selling ‘white powder’!” puns Chuang Chien-mo, now 82, the president of the Bangkok Starch Industrial Company and the creator of Thai Flower brand starch, with a mischievous smile on his face.

In fact, countless processed food products and chemical-industrial products are made with starch. The list includes aquaculture feed, rice crackers, sticky rice pastries (known in Japanese as mochi), instant noodles, yogurt, ice cream, cosmetics, and liquid starch for clothing. This “white powder” is an indispensable ingredient in modern daily life.

Southbound

Chuang Chien-mo was born in 1931, the son of a tenant farmer in Yilan County, Taiwan. As the eldest of nine brothers and sisters, he had to go out and start working in his early teens to help supplement the family income. Hardworking and responsible, step by step he made his way up from an ordinary employee to senior management, eventually holding important posts in several state and private organizations including Taiwan Machinery Manufacturing Corporation, the China Productivity Center, and Coca-Cola Taiwan.

Back in 1970, on a business trip to Thailand, ­Chuang Chien-mo met the person who would change his life—Zheng Ming­sheng, an Overseas-Chinese Thai. Even at their first meeting they felt like old friends. ­Chuang encouraged Zheng, who was then fretting over what to do about Chinese-language education for his children, to send his sons and daughters to Taiwan to study, and ­Chuang also volunteered to take care of them while they were in Taiwan. ­Zheng, searching for a way to repay his benefactor, invited ­Chuang to become a fellow investor in a new company founded in 1972: the Thai Preserved Food Factory Company Limited.

The company’s main product, Wai-Wai brand instant noodles, did not sell very well at first, and by the second year Thai Preserved Food was facing bankruptcy and closure. So Zheng Ming­sheng sought out the quick-thinking Chuang to ask his advice. Chuang drew on his previous experience at Coca-Cola: Coke was originally marketed in Taiwan in 270-milliliter bottles, but the large containers did not appeal much to consumers, who were not very rich in those days and not yet in the habit of drinking carbonated beverages. So they switched to 220-ml bottles that sold for a somewhat cheaper price, and sales took off.

Innovations as foundations

Chuang therefore suggested that Wai-Wai switch from their original 75–80-gram servings to 55-gram packages. He also created “the world’s first aromatic-oil and flavorings packet” using the basic seasoning of Taiwanese-style plain noodles (the main ingredients being vegetable oil and fragrant crispy fried shallots) and then adding a small packet of hot-pepper powder with the spicy flavor that Thais love. Consumers flipped over the new combination, which not only appealed to Thai tastes, but also proved to be popular in nearby Vietnam.

Today Wai-Wai is the second largest instant noodle brand in Thailand, thanks in no small part to ­Chuang Chien-mo. This was his first breakthrough idea in what would prove to be a personal “journey to the south” in pursuit of commercial opportunities.

In 1978, at 47 years old and with his children grown, Chuang found himself free of responsibilities, and he decided to pick up and move to Thailand. With his unique vision, he quickly set his sights on the large amounts of rice and cassava produced in Thailand, and decided to get into starch manufacturing. “It wasn’t a very popular sector, but there weren’t many competitors and the supply of raw materials was stable, so there was correspondingly less risk,” explains Chuang. (By the way, Chuang also picked up a new name! Like most Chinese living in Thailand, he adopted a Thai name, Ka­mon Chuang­cha­ro­en­dee.)

But business wasn’t all smooth sailing. In its second year the Bangkok Starch Industrial Company was hit by the first oil crisis. If the factory were unable to secure fuel for its operations, it would be forced to close. Unwilling to accept this fate without a fight, ­Chuang drew on another of his previous business experiences: When he was with Taiwan Machinery, because of budgetary limitations, they used sawdust to replace diesel fuel to fire their boilers.

Chuang went to a furniture factory and collected sawdust, which was considered waste, and then set up a reverberatory furnace, capable of reaching temperatures of 700ºC, in front of their existing boilers, making it possible to transfer the heat energy from the furnace directly into the boilers. It turned out that the sawdust was not only in no way inferior to diesel at producing energy, it even lowered fuel costs by US$150 per ton of product, and in this way the company easily made it through the oil crisis.

Breaking into Japan

Another of ­Chuang’s innovations was to find a way to break into the Japanese market, which foreigners have often found to be impenetrable.

Chuang had in fact long had his eye on the Japanese market. He notes that Japan is a major rice-consuming nation, and not only for table rice but also for rice crackers, mo­chi, and other types of rice-based snacks, with the raw material being sticky-rice flour.

The problem was that in order to protect its farmers the Japanese government had long banned the importation of sticky-rice flour. Chuang, who was educated under Japanese rule in Taiwan and speaks Japanese well, spent two whole years studying Japan’s customs regulations before finally finding a loophole in 1984. He discovered that France had got around restrictions on imports of wheat flour into Japan by calling it “cake mix flour,” so—after adding sugar to his sticky-rice flour—he renamed his product “rice pastry flour.” This end run around the import rules worked, and today Bangkok Starch sells 500 tons of sticky-rice flour to Japan each month.

In 1998, Chuang, already nearly 70 years of age, showed no signs of stopping his string of creative ideas, and he developed a new product that took markets by storm: rice starch.

Chuang points out that starch has traditionally been made using wheat, corn, cassava, and potato, of which cassava starch is the most widely used. However, overconsumption of cassava starch can lead to intestinal gas and digestive problems. After trying for many years, he finally developed a starch whose raw material is 100% rice, which is more easily digested and has fewer calories.

After water is added and the product is gelatinized (i.e. made more viscous), rice starch is soft and glossy to the touch. Its form is similar to that of butter, and it has the mouthfeel of fat, but without the high calories. It is used in many “diet” products such as low-fat ice cream, low-fat yoghurt, and “fat-free” potato chips.

Dynamism and flexibility

The production process for rice starch requires several steps. First comes soaking, grinding into a pulp, and separation in a centrifuge. Then come multiple washing and drying cycles, and thorough removal of the protein from the rice. Only then do you come up with clean, snow-white rice starch.

Because the process is so thorough, ­Chuang was able to make an unusual response to the floods in 2011. He unhesitatingly piled up hundreds of tons of bagged rice to dam floodwaters from penetrating his factory. Those outside the loop thought that he had doomed himself to severe losses, but he knew that rice that had merely been soaked in water could still be reused, if quickly moved to the production line and repeatedly processed.

This quick-thinking response to the flooding kept factory damage to a minimum. It also provided a further insight into ­Chuang’s dynamism, flexibility, and management ability.

After more than four decades in business, Chuang has developed his own operating philosophy. On one hand, he hates clients who come in with big orders and then try to haggle over the price. He might very well tell someone who lays in a huge order for 100 tons that he only can supply 80, so his counterpart will quickly give up ideas of leveraging the larger order for a cheaper price and instead count himself lucky to get anything at all!

But that’s a matter of principle, not avarice. In fact, when the price of raw materials for his products is about to fall, he will take the initiative to notify regular clients to put off their orders in order to save money. “If you want your business to last in the long run, you can’t be greedy. If we reliably provide the best product at a reasonable price, then business will just naturally get better and better,” he says with genuine sincerity.

Afraid to fail

Since the 1970s, Bangkok Starch has grown into one of Thailand’s biggest corporations. Each month it produces over 4000 tons of premium-quality starch, of which over 75% is exported to the US, Europe, and Japan, with the remainder being sold in Taiwan, mainland China, and the Thai domestic market.

Chuang, who never forgets his past, has brought all his brothers to share in his success. At present the family’s business empire—in addition to Bangkok Starch and Thai Preserved Food—has extended into electronics, paper, ceramics, construction, and more, with annual revenues estimated at over 10 billion baht.

Hearty and hale as ever, ­Chuang still arrives at the office each day at 8:00. He has never considered retiring. Asked how he has come so far in life, he draws our attention to a book that was a bestseller in Singapore: Afraid to Fail.

“If you are afraid to fail, then you fight for every advantage, act prudently, and keep moving forward all the time.” ­Chuang feels that the tiny country of Singapore has only been able to impress the entire world with its success because its citizens have been too scared of what would happen to them if they got out-competed. He applies the same logic to doing business.

One of ­Chuang’s most common catchphrases is “What nobody can do, I can.” If you can do what others have not thought to do, or have been unable to do, then you will have carved out a niche, a space, perhaps even an empire, for yourself. ­Chuang’s perseverance in coming up with path-breaking ideas is all the evidence needed to prove that his catchphrase is, for him, more than just a platitude.

相關文章

近期文章

繁體中文 日文

澱粉大王莊建模:創新是成功之母

文‧林欣靜 圖‧莊坤儒

2012年8月,老字號的台資企業「曼谷澱粉公司」,榮獲泰國出口產業最高榮譽「泰國總理外銷獎」,原因是該公司產品的外銷比例高達83%、原料則為百分百「Made in Thailand」的高級品、每月營收更高達1億5,000萬泰銖(約新台幣1億4,265萬元),堪稱是為泰國賺取巨額外匯與創造就業機會的金雞母。

而帶領這家看似冷門的、卻開創出前所未見新藍海的靈魂人物,即為人稱「澱粉大王」的台商莊建模。


澱粉真有這麼好賺?「我們公司每天可生產數百噸的『白粉』,賣白粉的怎麼可能會不賺錢?」自創「泰花牌」澱粉的曼谷澱粉公司董事長、現年已82歲的莊建模促狹地笑說。

事實上,舉凡水產飼料、米、糬、泡麵、優格、冰淇淋等加工食品,以及化妝品、衣服上漿劑等數不清的化工產品,都需使用澱粉,它是日常生活不可或缺的必需品。

與泰國華僑結緣,開啟南向之路

1931年次的莊建模,是出身宜蘭礁溪的佃農子弟,家中兄弟姐妹多達9人,身為老大的他,十幾歲就為了貼補家用而投入職場。但年輕時的莊建模非常清楚,唯有知識才能幫助自己翻身,因此即使工作再忙再累,他仍抽空上夜校,半工半讀完成高職學業。

工作認真負責的他,由小職員一步步爬上高階主管,曾在台灣機械公司、中國生產力中心及台中可口可樂公司等多家公民營企業任職。

1970年,莊建模至泰國出差時,結識了他口中念茲在茲的貴人、泰國華僑鄭明昇,兩人一見如故,他鼓勵正為孩子的華文教育苦惱的鄭明昇,將子女送至台灣留學,並自願負起照顧之責;知恩圖報的鄭明昇,則邀請他入股1972年成立的泰國食品工業公司。

當時泰國食品工業所生產的「WAI-WAI」牌泡麵,初期銷售成績並不佳,第二年即面臨倒閉危機,鄭明昇再度找來腦筋動得快的莊建模商討對策。莊建模想起了任職可口可樂時的經驗──可口可樂原採270ml的大瓶裝,但大容量對當時經濟仍在起步、又不嗜飲碳酸飲料的台灣消費者來說稍嫌過多,市場反應不佳;後來將容量調整為220ml的小瓶裝、定價也略為下降後,銷售數字才一飛沖天。

多次創新奠定成功基石

從「意猶未盡,才能刺激消費」的可口可樂經驗,莊建模因而建議將原本重量達75~80克的WAI-WAI泡麵,減重為55克;他還綜合台灣陽春麵與泰國人嗜辣的口味,開發出「天下第一包清香油」(主要原料為植物油與爆香的紅葱頭)調味包,並附贈一小包辣椒粉,沒想到大受市場歡迎,新產品不僅正對泰國人的胃口,就連鄰國越南都趨之若鶩。

莊建模說,當時正在打越戰,越共大量採購他們的泡麵,作為儲備糧食,清香油可以拿去炒菜、麵體則能充當乾糧,泰國食品工業公司也因此大賺一筆。

如今「WAI-WAI」泡麵已是泰國第二大的速食麵品牌,莊建模的功不可沒,這是他南向之路的首次創新。

1978年,47歲的莊建模,因孩子皆已成年,再無後顧之憂,決定舉家遷往泰國發展。眼光獨到的他,看準了泰國盛產的稻米和木薯而投入澱粉產業。「雖然冷門,但競爭者少,原料來源又穩定,風險相對也較少,」莊建模解釋。

然而,曼谷澱粉公司成立的第二年,遇到石油危機,工廠苦無燃料可運作,眼看就得停產關門。不願坐以待斃的莊建模,又想起了早年任職於台灣機械公司時,因預算有限,而以木屑代替柴油作為鍋爐燃料的經驗。

他到家具工廠蒐集木屑廢料,並在原有的鍋爐前,加設一個溫度可達700℃的木屑燃燒反射爐,即可將木屑燃燒的熱能送進鍋爐。結果效果不但不輸柴油,每噸產品還能節省美金150元的油料成本,終於順利度過能源危機。

打破日本的鎖國政策

莊建模的創新策略,更讓他打開外人極難突破的日本市場。

早就相準日本市場的莊建模指出,日本為米食大國,除了米飯外,包括米菓、蔴糬及各式甜食,都需使用糯米粉。

但為了保護當地農民,日本政府長期禁止糯米粉進口。從小受日本教育、嫻熟日語的莊建模,為此花了整整兩年時間,研究日本的海關法規,1984年他依樣畫葫蘆模仿法國以「糕餅預拌粉」名義,進口麵粉至日本的經驗,將糯米粉加糖成為「米糕餅粉」,終於瓦解海關的防堵。

「糖的顆粒比糯米粉大得多,採購米糕餅粉的廠商,很容易就能把糖篩出、取得單純的糯米粉,」莊建模得意地分享打破日本閉關政策的秘訣。如今曼谷澱粉公司每月銷往日本的糯米粉,已多達五百多噸。

1998年,年近70歲的莊建模,仍然沒有停止他的創新之路,還開發出震驚市場的新產品「米澱粉」。

莊建模指出,傳統澱粉是以小麥、玉米、木薯及馬鈴薯製作,其中又以木薯澱粉的運用最廣,但木薯澱粉食用過多,常有脹氣、不易消化等缺點。經過多年嘗試後,他終於開發出百分百以大米為原料,更易消化且熱量更低的米澱粉。

加水糊化後的米澱粉,質感柔滑、形似奶油,具有脂肪的口感,卻沒有同等的高熱量,因此成為絕佳的脂肪代替品,包括歐美常見的低脂冰淇淋、低脂優格、低脂洋芋片等減肥食材,都是運用米澱粉來達成「好吃又不會變胖」的完美口感。

彈性十足的經營策略

米澱粉的製程,得經過多道關卡,須先經由浸漬、磨漿、離心機分離,再配合多次清洗及乾燥、徹底去除大米上的蛋白質後,才能取得雪白純淨的米澱粉。

因此,2011年泰國洪患時,莊建模竟毫不猶豫地搬出數百噸的「米沙包」阻斷洪水。不明就裡的人,以為他必然損失慘重,但其實泡過水的原料,只要能儘快送入產線,經過繁複的製程,仍可再度利用;加上他的數百名員工,都住在工廠宿舍,就算淹水期間,也不致因交通受阻、無法上班而停產。

明快的因應災變,讓工廠的損失降至最低,由此也可窺見莊建模兼具魄力與彈性的經營手腕。

在商場上打拚四十多年,他自有一套「保持新鮮感、絕不貪心」的經營哲學,例如當客戶大手筆地下訂100噸貨品時,他往往以「沒有那麼多貨可出」為由,只願供應80噸。如此可讓客戶有「洛陽紙貴」的搶手感而更加惜貨,又可因「都沒貨了、無法殺價」而保有產品的價格優勢。

而當產品原料即將降價前,他也會主動幫客戶省錢,通知他們延後訂貨。「做生意要長長久久,絕對不能貪心,我們穩定供應最好的產品和最合理的價格,生意自然就能越做越好,」他誠懇地說。

怕輸,就不要怕標新立異

從1978年發展至今,曼谷澱粉公司已成為泰國赫赫有名的大企業,每月可生產四千多噸的優質澱粉,光是出口至美國、歐洲及日本等先進國家,即占總產量的75%以上,其餘產品則分銷台灣、中國大陸及泰國本地市場。

念舊的莊建模,也在功成名就後,找來所有兄弟協助並分享他的經營成果。目前家族企業除了曼谷澱粉、泰國食品工業外,還跨足電機、紙業、陶瓷、建築等多項產業,年營收估計在百億泰銖以上。

老當益壯的莊建模,至今仍維持每天早上8點到公司上班的習慣,從未想過退休,精神矍鑠的他,思路明晰,工作幹勁一點也不輸年輕人。提及這一路走來的經營歷程,他特別分享一本新加坡的暢銷書《怕輸》。

「怕輸,所以得戰戰兢兢、小心翼翼,只能往上,不能往下。」莊建模認為,小國寡民的新加坡,就是秉持「怕輸」的信念,才能在政治、經濟、金融、環保等各方面,皆有傲視全球的傑出表現。

「做生意也是如此,正因為不想輸,才有源源不絕的創新,這不就是台語『愛拚才會贏』的真意嗎?」

「No body can do, I can」,這是莊建模常掛在嘴邊的名言,別人想不到、做不到的事,自己若能辦到,就可闖出一片天。他鍥而不捨、不斷創新而開疆闢土的創業歷程,正好作為這句話最佳註腳。

イノベーションを続ける澱粉大王・荘建模

文・林欣静 写真・荘坤儒

2012年8月、タイの老舗台湾企業「バンコクスターチ」が、タイの輸出業界最高の栄誉であるタイ国首相輸出企業賞に輝いた。その理由は、同社の製品の原料は100%タイ産の高級品で83%が輸出され、月々の売上は1億5000万バーツ(約1億4265万台湾ドル)に達し、タイに巨額の外貨をもたらすと同時に、多くの雇用機会を生み出しているというものである。

この、あまり注目されることのない分野で大きな市場を切り開いたのは、「澱粉大王」と呼ばれる台湾の荘建模である。


澱粉がこんなに売れるのだろうか。「当社は毎日数百トンの『白い粉』を生産できます。白い粉の販売で利益が出ないわけがありません」と、自社ブランド「タイフラワー」を生産販売するバンコクスターチ董事長、今年82歳の荘建模は笑う。

実は、水産飼料、もち、インスタント麺、ヨーグルト、アイスクリームなどの加工食品、それに化粧品や衣類用糊など数々の化工製品には、すべて澱粉が使用されており、日常生活に欠かすことのできない製品なのである。

タイへの進出

1931年生まれの荘建模は宜蘭県礁渓の小作農家に生まれた。兄弟姉妹は9人で、長男の彼は家計を助けるために10代で働き始めた。だが、その頃から彼は、知識がなければ貧しさを抜け出すことはできないと考えており、仕事がどんなに大変でも夜学に通い、働きながら職業高校を卒業した。

真面目に働く彼は一歩ずつ昇格して管理職になり、台湾機械や中国生産力センター、コカ・コーラなどで働いた。

1970年にタイに出張した時、今も彼が恩人と呼ぶタイ華僑の鄭明昇に出会った。子供の中国語教育について悩んでいた鄭に荘は台湾留学を勧め、台湾での生活の面倒を見ることにした。鄭はそれに感謝して、1972年に設立したタイ・プリザーブド・フード・ファクトリーへの出資を誘った。

当時タイ・プリザーブド・フードが生産するWAIWAIブランドのインスタント麺が売れず、倒産の危機に直面したため、鄭明昇は荘建模に対策を相談した。荘はコカ・コーラにいた時の経験を思い出した。かつて、コーラの720mlのボトルは炭酸飲料に慣れていない台湾の消費者には多過ぎて売れず、220mlの小瓶にして価格を下げたところ、売上は急激に伸びたのである。

革新を重ねる

そこで彼は、1袋75~80gのインスタント麺を55gに縮小することを提案した。さらにタイ風の辛い味に台湾の麺の風味を合わせて、「天下初の清香油」(エシャロットの揚げ油)を開発し、唐辛子粉の袋もつけたところ、これが大ヒットしたのである。新製品はタイ人の味覚にあっただけでなく、お隣のベトナムでも大評判となった。

当時はベトナム戦争の最中で、ベトナム解放戦線はこのインスタント麺を大量に調達して備蓄食糧とした。清香油は炒め物にも使え、麺はそのまま食べることもできるからだ。

現在、WAIWAIがタイ第2のインスタント麺ブランドとなっているのには荘建模の功労が大きく、これが彼の東南アジア進出の第一歩となった。

1978年、47歳になった彼は、子供も成人して心配がなくなったため、一家揃ってタイへ移住した。独自の目を持つ彼はタイでは米とキャッサバが盛んに栽培されていることから、澱粉産業を始めることを決める。「注目されない分野ですが、原料供給は安定しているし、リスクが少ないのです」と言う。

だが、バンコクスターチを設立した翌年、石油危機が襲い、工場は燃料不足で操業できなくなった。このまま指をくわえているわけにはいかないと智恵を絞った彼は、かつて台湾機械でジーゼルの代りに木屑を燃料にした経験を思い出した。

彼は家具工場から木屑を引き取り、既存の炉の前に700℃に達する木屑燃焼反射炉を設けたところ、効果はジーゼルに劣らず、燃料費は製品1トン当たり150米ドル節約でき、石油危機を乗り越えることができた。

日本の保護政策を打破

荘建模は革新戦略によって、多くの企業が成功しない日本市場への進出を果たした。

早くから日本市場に目を付けていた荘によると、日本は米食大国で、ご飯の他にせんべいや餅など、さまざまな米菓子があり、いずれももち米粉を必要とする。

だが、国内農業を保護するために日本政府は長年にわたってもち米粉の輸入を禁じてきた。日本統治時代の教育を受け、日本語が堪能な荘建模は2年をかけて日本の税関法規を勉強し、1984年にフランス企業が「洋菓子用粉」の名義で日本への小麦粉輸出に成功したのに倣い、もち米粉に砂糖を加えた「米菓子用粉」の輸出に成功した。

「砂糖の粒子はもち米粉の粒子より大きいので、購入したメーカーは、もち米粉と砂糖と容易に分けることができ、もち米粉だけを取り出して使えます」と荘建模は対日輸出成功の秘訣を公表する。現在、バンコクスターチから日本へのもち米粉輸出量は月500トンを超える。

1998年、70歳近くなった荘建模はその革新を止めることはなく、市場を驚かせる「米澱粉」を開発した。

その話によると、従来の澱粉は小麦やトウモロコシ、キャッサバ、ジャガイモなどを原料としているが、中でもキャッサバ澱粉は消化が悪いという欠点があった。そこで長年の研究の末、彼は米100%で消化が良くカロリーの低い米澱粉の開発に成功したのである。

水を加えて糊状にした米澱粉はクリームのように柔らかく滑らかで、まるで脂肪分が入っているように感じられるが、カロリーは高くないため脂肪の代替品になる。低脂肪アイスクリームや低脂肪ヨーグルト、低脂肪ポテトチップスなどの原料として米澱粉が用いられている。

フレキシブルな経営戦略

米澱粉の製造工程は複雑だ。米を水に浸し、挽き、遠心分離機にかけ、幾度も洗って乾燥させ、徹底的に米のタンパク質を取り除かなければならない。

2011年にタイが洪水に見舞われた時、荘建模は数百トン分の「米の土嚢」で浸水を防いだ。大変な損失だと思うかもしれないが、実は水に浸かった米もすぐに生産ラインに入れ、複雑な工程を経れば利用できるのである。また工場の数百人の従業員はみな宿舎に住んでいるため、洪水の最中も通勤に困ることはなく、生産ラインを止める必要はなかった。

明快な対応で工場の損失を最小限に抑えたことからも、彼の実行力とフレキシブルな手腕がうかがえる。

40余年にわたるビジネスの経験から荘建模は「新鮮な感覚を保ち続け、決して欲を出さない」という経営哲学を生み出してきた。例えば顧客から100トンという大量の注文が入っても「それだけの商品はないから」と80トンしか受けない。これによって顧客は商品が簡単には手に入らない貴重なものと感じ、値引きを要求することもなくなるのである。

だが、原料価格が下がる前には、顧客に、注文を先送りすれば安くなると通知する。「商売は長いお付き合いですから、決して欲を出してはいけません。安定的に最良の製品を最も合理的な価格で提供していけば、商売は自ずとうまくいくものです」と誠意を込めて語る。

負けたくない

今日、バンコクスターチはタイでは広く名の知れた大企業であり、毎月4000トンの良質の澱粉を生産している。欧米や日本などの先進国への輸出が75%以上を占め、その他は台湾や中国大陸、タイ国内などへ販売されている。

自分のルーツを忘れない荘建模は功成り名を遂げた後、すべての兄弟を呼び寄せて経営成果を分かち合っている。現在その関連企業は、バンコクスターチとタイ・フード・ファクトリーの他に電機、製紙、陶磁器、建築など多岐にわたり、年間売上は100億バーツを超える。

老いてますます元気な荘建模は、今も毎朝8時に出勤し、退職など考えたことはない。思考も明晰で、やる気も若者に少しも劣らない。これまでの事業を振り返り、シンガポールのベストセラー『怕輸(負けたくない)』を紹介してくれた。

「負けたくないと思うと、戦々兢々として注意深くなり、上を目指すしかなくなります」と荘建模は説明する。人口が少ないシンガポールは、この精神があればこそ、政治、経済、金融、環境など各方面で世界に誇る実績を上げてきた。「ビジネスも同じで、負けたくないからこそ革新を続けるのです」

荘建模は常に「No body can do, I can」と考える。他人にできないことをやれば、そこに広い世界が広がる。その姿勢と実績は、この言葉を体現しているのではないだろうか。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!