Compassion in the Mountains: Taitung St. Mary's Hospital at Half a Century

:::

2010 / 7月

Chen Hsin-yi /photos courtesy of Chuang Kung-ju /tr. by Josh Aguiar


If you decide to visit St. Mary's Hos-pital in Taitung, be advised that you might find that most of the employees are out doing fieldwork.

Bright and early at 8:30 one morning a group comprising a nun, a doctor, and a nurse are en route to care for patients in Taiyuan Village. A delivery truck bearing meals for the elderly follows not far behind. At 10 a.m. over at a day-care center in Jinfeng Township's Jialan Village a team of social workers and aromatherapists are tending to several dozen elderly Aboriginal women, leading them in activities and invigorating them with massages. That afternoon, internist Lin Jui-hsiang lectures in the community on diabetes prevention and care, and the hospital's associate administrator, Jennifer Chen, graciously leads visitors on a tour of the "health farm" and learning center, Pei-Tse Institute, both of which are scheduled to open in the near future.

How is it possible then that a clearly flourishing institution has come close to shuttering its doors twice in the past seven years, was all but given a death sentence by experts, and had even its most ardent church supporters resigned to accepting its closure as the will of the Almighty?

But this little hospital has undergone a resurgence and transformation that is nothing short of miraculous as they continue to build upon their dreams of being both a quality hospice and health center for all of eastern Taiwan.

Its story goes back half a century to the pioneering efforts of two European missionaries.


A beacon in the mountains

In Switzerland at the end of the 19th century, a French minister named Rev. Pierre-Marie Barral founded the Bethlehem Institute, later renamed the Societas Missionaria de Bethlehem in Helvetia (SMB), an international missionary training academy. According to the society's founding precepts, the graduates of the school were obliged to do missionary work overseas in remote areas without any Christian presence. Moreover, they were to make every effort to integrate themselves into the local culture and to minister to the needs of marginalized people.

In 1953, two of the society's members, Rev. Jacob Hilber and Rev. Lukas Stoffel, relocated to Taitung after being expelled from China, which following the Communist Revolution had become inhospitable towards foreign missionaries. They recruited others to come assist them with preaching the gospel in Aboriginal villages, and also poured their energies into health care, education, social work, and even linguistic and cultural studies.

In 1961, after receiving funding from overseas, they built Taitung St. Mary's Hospital. In the beginning, there was only one clinic and four beds. Today, the original edifices can be seen in the interior court, a small two-story white building that is a dormitory for nuns and a chapel.

At that time, Taitung had only one hospital under the auspices of the Department of Health. Medical personnel and equipment were in extreme short supply. Taiwanese doctors were reluctant to practice in remote rural areas. As a result, in the beginning St. Mary's funding came entirely from overseas donations, and the hospital was staffed by foreign missionary doctors who donated their services. They also recruited two Irish nuns from the Medical Missionaries of Mary to take charge of obstetrics.

Since Taitung is home to a number of diverse ethnic groups, many languages are spoken there, including Mandarin, Taiwanese, Hakka, Japanese, and six different Aboriginal languages. Recognizing this as a serious challenge, the nuns and brothers of the hospital began training locals as nursing assistants from day one.

Though they have been working for over 40 years, three assistants Zhong Guangmei, Shi Xiuying, and Huang Qiuzhen (nicknamed "Old Huang") still remember the early days. In the 1970s, they earned NT$4,000 a month, with room and board provided by the hospital. Curfew was at 9 p.m. sharp. Every week the nuns taught two nursing classes and two English classes. In the daytime, they worked in the clinic giving shots, preparing prescriptions, helping administer anesthesia, and assisting with deliveries.

The nuns and brothers would schedule leisure activities to provide relief from the tightly regimented work schedule. Sometimes the group of more than 10 young ladies would go for a drive and a picnic, or on their afternoon break they would all take the bus to Shanyuan Beach to escape the heat by swimming. The biggest lesson they gleaned from all that time working in close cooperation with their teachers was, "to put the patients first and to cultivate a compassionate heart."

Going where others fear to tread

In 1975 a French missionary organization, the Daughters of Charity, assumed stewardship of the hospital, which by that point, thanks to the diligence of the hospital staff, had matured into a women's hospital with 30 beds.

Under new management spearheaded by American nun Sr. Agnes McPhee, who served as the hospital's second administrator, and another American nun who came in 1979, Sr. Patricia Aycock, St. Mary's broke new ground by introducing a domiciliary care program that is still in use today.

Back in the 1970s there was a huge disparity between urban and rural resources, and transportation was underdeveloped, as well. Sr. Agnes frequently made boat trips out to outlying Lanyu to educate the residents on health matters; when patients came to St. Mary's from Lanyu for treatment, Agnes would see to their meals and accommodations.

Sr. Patricia, who specialized in anesthesiology as a nursing student, was the first person to implement the "clinic on wheels" approach, though she modestly denies credit for the idea, simply stating that she was the only sister who knew how to drive. She would spend entire days driving from village to village, her car loaded up with medicines, patient files, and medical equipment. She faced the challenge of being both pilot and navigator on these trips, and moreover, as the anesthesia expert, she had to be ready to return to the hospital at a moment's notice. "I used to borrow the phones in the village churches to check in with the hospital-if there was an urgent operation waiting, I'd have to hurry back immediately," she says.

Among Patricia's homecare patients are numerous poor Aborigines who became paraplegics after suffering road accidents while young due to either drinking or fatigue. Attending to them requires combining aspects of nursing (cleaning bedsores, physical rehabilitation, and even helping with laundry and cleaning) with those of social work (securing financial assistance and helping children attend school), as well as ministering to their spiritual needs.

"The nuns are always reminding everybody: it's our job to do what others don't and to go where others won't," says Sense Chen, who came aboard at the end of 2006 as the hospital's CEO. Whereas the great majority of hospitals view domiciliary care in remote regions as a costly, tenuous undertaking, St. Mary's has picked up the slack, throwing itself headlong into the daunting task. The program has expanded to the point that their operational scope now extends from as far north as Changbin Township at the border of Hualien and Taitung Counties all the way down south to the Taitung-Pingtung junction of Daren Township, a meandering 190-kilometer stretch of coastal highway. This, of course, does not include the tribal villages tucked away in the mountains that are an hour-and-a-half drive's distance, nor does it include the 150 visits per year that the hospital's staff make out to the peripheral islands of Lanyu and Green Island.

Mending disparities

While the advent of comprehensive national health insurance in the 1990s did much to make health care affordable for most Taiwanese, the conditions in remoter regions nevertheless lagged far behind.

According to statistics published in 1995, Taitung County's mortality rates per 100,000 residents-irrespective of the cause of death-were considerably higher than other parts of Taiwan. Taitung also topped the lists in another unfortunate category: the incidence of malignant tumors. Even in recent years, 600 county patients enter the late stages of cancer annually, and their mean residual life expectancy is more than 10 years less than that of Taipei City residents.

Moreover, in Taitung County the number of deaths of people in their prime due to accidents is high, as are instances of heart disease, kidney ailments, and other chronic illnesses. This suggests that many carry a heavy burden of toil and stress in their struggle to make ends meet, and highlights the great impact of social and economic inequality on health and wellbeing.

To make matters worse, in the mid-1990s, St. Mary's Hospital, long a beacon of hope for an impoverished community, began unraveling financially, seemingly no longer able to keep up with the times.

Chen examines the causes behind the hardship. Beginning in the 1980s, St. Mary's, in keeping with the Catholic faith's traditional self-reliance, began gradually weaning themselves off of foreign donations-domestic contributions have always been sporadic. Moreover, the restructuring of the medical system based on enterprise and market principles had shaken the more public-service-minded St. Mary's, even threatening their once reliable obstetrics department.

Seventy-six-year-old Sr. Matilde Sansolis Serneo, the recipient of the 12th Medical Devotion Award (conferred by the Department of Health) in 2003, recalls that with the enacting of the hospital accreditation program in the 1990s, the majority of the hospitals had to scramble to fall in line with the new standards. St. Mary's was found to have a number of inadequacies; among them were disorganized management, the failure to prepare and archive their medical billing and records according to the International Classification of Diseases, substandard quality of care (including the fact that the nurses were not properly licensed), and the building was old and not in compliance with fire codes.

The plainspoken Sr. Matilde takes a curt view of the situation. "When they asked me to explain the organizational structure of the hospital, I didn't really know what to say," she says. "I just told them that we use flat management. I told them we all have a number of hats to wear and that we take our responsibilities very seriously."

All of the nuns, she recalls, were scurrying about frantically to make the necessary improvements: one person burned the midnight oil sorting through all the medical files, another started learning how to use a computer, and yet another attended classes at the fire department. In order to get their already veteran nurses past the licensing hurdle, they arranged for teachers from nursing cram schools in northern Taiwan to come every weekend to teach. In the end, their efforts paid off: the hospital received accreditation on the third evaluation.

The hospital weeps

Ironically, between 1990 and 2001, the Department of Health singled out no less than six of St. Mary's employees for distinguished service awards, making the hospital the most frequent recipient of public commendation in all of Taiwan. But in 2003 its financial woes boiled over, and they found themselves unable to pay the workers' salaries; they had finally hit rock bottom and were forced to decide whether to fight on or to close the hospital's doors forever.

Chen Shih-hsien well remembers the air of desperation permeating the hospital during that troubled hour. A private hospital offered to buy St. Mary's, but was only interested in the hospital buildings and the physicians; the remaining 80 employees were to be left to fend for themselves. The hospital director could not abide so inhumane a proposition. On one inclement day, as rain poured down on the hospital's dark empty corridors, the ceiling began to leak. Orthopedist Shih Shao-wei, a dedicated, irreproachably loyal physician, let out a sad sigh: "The hospital is weeping."

At this critical juncture, two important church figures, Bishop Huang Chao-ming, the newly appointed head of the Hualien Diocese, and Sr. Cheng Yun, the former director of St. Mary's, provided invaluable support, and more significantly, practical counsel. The hospital needed to capitalize on its strengths-its warm familial atmosphere and concern for patients' spiritual, as well as physical wellbeing-and focus on becoming a leader for the Taitung region in the emerging fields of preventative and hospice care.

In 2004, St. Mary's established the first hospice care center in Taitung, inviting former Taipei Medical University internist Fu Shan-shan and Huang Kuan-chiu, another internist with ample experience in private practice, to serve as co-directors. That very year, the Department of Health recognized their outstanding contribution. In addition, Dr. Chao Co-shi of National Cheng Kung University Hospital, the woman considered to be the mother of Taiwanese hospice care, has frequently lauded the quality of care at St. Mary's.

Reaping what they have sown

The change of focus made it possible for St. Mary's to be reborn. Beginning in 2005, the hospital received commendation from the Taitung County Government four consecutive years for the quality of their domiciliary care. Then in 2008 the hospital became the recipient of the 18th Medical Devotion Award in the group category, the first time in the award's history that it was given to a hospital.

"Depending on your perspective, I suppose this award could be called the 'fool's award,' because only a fool would persist in doing what we've been doing under the conditions that we've been doing it-a normal person wouldn't have anything to do with it," jokes Chen. But in a capitalist society dominated by utilitarian thinking, this quixotic spirit is even more compelling, which is why it always succeeds in attracting talent and material support.

For example, five years ago Cardinal Tien Hospital's authority on diabetes, Professor Lin Jui-hsiang, flew down to Taitung on his own coin for a few days every month to help St. Mary's set up a diabetes support group, as well as to promote healthy living. He has since become a resident physician at St. Mary's. No less prestigious an individual than the former head of neonatal intensive care at Cathay General Hospital, Yuh Yeong-Seng, was willing to assume directorship of St. Mary's in 2008 after the previous director Shih Shao-wei died of cancer. Early in 2009, the executive director of Catholic Sanipax Socio-Medical Service and Education Foundation, Jennifer Chen, officially took up the post of associate administrator after volunteering for the hospital for more than 20 years.

Unexpected windfalls arrived in bunches. In 2006, after making repeated entreaties, Jennifer Chen succeeded in convincing a Taitung native by the name of Shunzi to set up and run a health club on a vacant space within the hospital campus. Shunzi was the proprietor of a bed and breakfast in the area, as well as a stellar cook; Chen pursued him because she admired the relaxed, congenial atmosphere of his homestay. Shunzi's interest in the venture was 12 years of management rights of the club, under a "build, operate, transfer" arrangement.

Much to everyone's amazement, the perfectionist Shunzi exceeded all expectations in building a club that fused seamlessly with the hospital. In the design phase, the blueprint became more elaborate with each rendition. Construction took longer than anticipated, so Shunzi sold his homestay and invested the NT$30 million profit into the new project. Two years later, a club much grander and more beautiful than anyone initially expected was completed. Even more unexpected was when Shunzi announced that he was relinquishing his 12-year interest in the club, saying, "Why should helping people have to wait 12 years?" Thus, St. Mary's assumed immediate ownership of the club (though they did finally reimburse Shunzi NT$9 million in gratitude for his generosity) which now provides county residents with organic food and healthy living classes at an affordable price.

More good fortune was to follow. In 2007, a patient was attending a clinic for diabetics on managing blood sugar. The patient, Michael Liu, was a landscaper by profession, and the affinity he felt for the hospital was so powerful that he volunteered four months of his time working on a therapeutic garden replete with a stream and a gazebo so that patients and visitors alike may enjoy a soothing respite.

"It seems that if we maintain the desire to serve the people in our hearts, kind people and good deeds will be visited back upon us," smiles the kindly and gregarious Associate Administrator Chen.

This positive energy is more than just the reward of compassionate seeds planted a half-century ago: it represents a yearning in contemporary Taiwanese society for a more humane model of medicine. This is perhaps why when St. Mary's sought financing to help them become an incorporated foundation (land appreciation tax alone cost NT$16 million) in April of 2009, the hospital raised an astonishing NT$89 million from generous contributors in just eight days, far in excess of the projected goal of NT$30 million.

As St. Mary's continues its march towards a shining future, it is clear that it belongs not only to Taitung-nor is it simply a hospital-it is a glowing example of the never-ending project to build a kinder, more humane society.

相關文章

近期文章

日文 繁體中文

困難を乗り越え愛の果実をみのらせる ――台東聖母病院

文・陳歆怡 写真・荘坤儒

台東の聖母病院を訪れる際には覚悟したほうがいい。病院のスタッフはたいてい「病院外勤務中」だということを。

朝8時半、修道女と医師、看護師1名ずつを載せた在宅介護車は泰源村へと向かっていた。それから間もなく、高齢者用食事搬送車も出発準備を始めた。午前10時、金峰郷嘉蘭村のデイケアセンターでは、病院のソーシャルワーカーとアロマセラピストが数10名の原住民高齢女性を対象にグループ活動やマッサージを進めていた。午後、内科の林瑞祥医師は地域で糖尿病講座を催し、一方、陳良娟・副院長は遠くから訪れた参観者を、オープン間近の健康農園と研修センター「培質院」に案内し、来年の健康促進講座の予約を受け付けていた。

活発な光景を見ていると、この病院が過去7年間に2度も閉鎖の危機に見舞われ「生き残りは不可能」と専門家に診断されたとは想像し難い。近年世界各地で、長年僻地のケアを続けてきた教会運営の病院が、経営不振や環境の変化に適応できず、次々と閉鎖されている。信徒ですら「我々に休めと言う主の御心です」と言うほどだ。

だが、スタッフが家族のように働くこの「小さな」病院は、奇跡のように再生を果たし、しかも夢はますます「大きく」なっている。広大な台東県ばかりか、台湾東部全体のホスピスと健康促進センターを目指そうというのである。

この物語は、半世紀前にヨーロッパから来た2人の宣教師がまいた種から始まる。


東部医療のあけぼの

聖母病院の隣には落ち着いた庭園がある。花や木に囲まれて建つその白い建物には、「カトリック・ベツレヘム宣教会(以下「ベツレヘム会」)」の70歳を超える4人の会士が暮らす。彼らは台東を第二の故郷とし、長年この地の原住民や外国人労働者のケア、或いは自然保護に力を尽くしてきた。

ベツレヘム会は、19世紀末にフランスのバラル神父がスイスに創設した宣教学校に端を発する。この学校の訓練を終えた会員は、教会のない地に赴いて宣教活動を行うほか、できるだけ現地文化に溶け込み、弱い立場の人々のために奉仕しなければならないとされている。

1953年10月、ベツレヘム会の2人の修道士ヤコブ・ヒルバーとルカス・ストフェルが、外国人宣教師を排斥していた共産党中国から、台湾の台東へと移ってきた。後にさらに多くの仲間を得て、原住民集落で宣教活動を行うほか、医療、教育、社会的事業、言語や風俗研究にも従事した。

1961年、ベツレヘム会は海外で資金を募り、台東市街地に台東聖母病院を建設(現在の病院の傍らにある、修道女宿舎になっている2階建ての白い建物と聖堂)、最初は診察室ひと間とベッド4床だけだった。

当時の台東には署立病院しかなく、人手も設備も不足した東部で働きたがる台湾人医師は少なかった。聖母病院でも資金は国外からの寄付に頼り、信徒の外国人医師が医療に従事、また聖母医療伝教会から2人のアイルランド人修道女を招き、産婦人科を運営していた。

多様なエスニック・グループを抱える台東は使用言語も多種にわたる(華語、閩南語、客家語、日本語、6種類の原住民語)。それで、まずは現地の看護助手の養成に力を入れた。助手と通訳をさせるためだ。

当時の助手で、今や奉仕年数も40年を超える鐘光美さん、施秀英さん、黄秋珍さんはかつてを振り返る。当時(1970年代)、給料は月4000元で宿舎も食事も病院が提供してくれ、門限は夜9時だった。修道女による看護と英語の授業が週2時間ずつ行われ、昼は診察室で助手を務めた。注射、薬の調合、麻酔や出産の手伝いなどあらゆることを学んだ。

規律的で忙しい仕事の合間を縫い、修道士や修道女は息抜きもさせてくれた。10数人の女子を車に乗せてピクニックに出かけたり、昼休みにはバスで杉原海岸まで泳ぎに行ったりした。互いが親密に過ごしたあの頃、深く心に刻まれたのは「患者優先と愛の精神」だという。

ほかの人がしないことを

1975年、フランスに本部を置くカトリック「愛徳姉妹会」が聖母病院の経営を引き継ぐ。スタッフの努力の下、聖母病院はベッド30床を備える産婦人科病院に成長した。

愛徳姉妹会の経営で聖母病院は新たな取り組みを始める。アメリカ人の2代目院長シスター・マクフィーと1979年に来台したシスター・アイコックが在宅ケアを始めたのである。

交通の便の悪かった70年代、シスター・マクフィーはたびたび船で蘭嶼に渡り、衛生教育を行った。蘭嶼のタオ人が病院に来れば、泊めてやり食事も与えた。慣れないベッドや部屋に泊まりたがらない原住民がいれば、彼らを尊重して病院の木の下で野宿をさせた。病院の調理室には彼らからの礼であるトビウオが並んだ。

看護学校で麻酔科を専攻したシスター・アイコックは、車を運転して台東の山間地や辺鄙な海岸を訪れ、在宅ケアを始めた初めての人である(彼女は謙遜し、当時車の運転ができたのは自分だけだったからと言う)。当時は一人で1日中車を走らせた。カルテや医療器材、薬品を積み込み、道探しをしながらの運転で、しかも途中の教会に寄っては病院に電話を入れた。「麻酔して手術という急患がいれば、私はすぐさま病院に戻らなければなりませんから」

シスター・アイコックの医療の対象は貧しい原住民が多かった。若くして飲酒か疲労による交通事故で半身不随になったというような場合、そのケアは看護(床ずれの治療やリハビリ、一人暮らしの場合は洗濯や掃除まで)だけでなく、ソーシャルワーク(生活援助や子女の就学援助の手配)も必要とされた。

「シスターたちはいつも『人が行かない所に行き、人がしないことをしなさい』と言います」2006年に聖母病院に来た陳世賢CEOはこう語る。遠くてコストもかかるので他の病院が尻込みするような地域に在宅ケアを広げたのは、そういう考えからだ。今や北は台東・花蓮の境にある長浜郷から、南は台東・屏東の境の達仁郷里まで延々と190キロにわたる海岸線や、車で1時間半もかかる山間集落、また蘭嶼や緑島へも赴き、同病院が扱う在宅ケアは年に150件に上る。

しかも聖母病院は、健康保険の規定である150〜500元の交通費を受け取らない。「その費用のために、病を我慢する人がいてはいけませんから」とシスター・アイコックは言う。

合格のために必死

1990年代、国民健康保険の実施にともない、多くの庶民の医療費問題は解決された。しかし僻地の社会福祉や医療には、なおも大きな改善が必要だ。

台東県の場合1995年の統計によれば、死亡率は台湾全体と比べて非常に高い(あらゆる死因で)。悪性腫瘍にかかる人口比と増加率も台湾でトップ、毎年平均600名の末期癌患者がおり、平均余命は台北市民より10年以上も短い。

また青壮年でも台東県は事故死者、心臓血管或いは腎臓方面の慢性病患者の比率が高い。これは、重い負担を抱えた生活、社会・経済的な不平等さが健康を害していることを物語る。

そんな苦境にある人々にとって心身の拠り所であった聖母病院が、90年代半ばには時代の変化に追いつけず、経済的困窮に見舞われた。

陳世賢さんはこう説明する。カトリックの「自立自給」精神に基づき、聖母病院は1980年代に徐々に海外からの募金受付をやめるようになった。だが台湾国内の寄付は少ない。しかも台湾では医療の企業化や市場化が進み始め、公益的性格を持つ聖母病院は、最も人気のあった産婦人科ですら次第にかげりが見え始めた。

衛生署から2003年に全国医療奉仕貢献賞を受けた76歳になるフィリピン人のシスター・セルネオは当時を振り返る。1990年代に病院評価制度が実施され、医療体質調整という厳しい現実に直面した。評価結果によれば、聖母病院には改善すべき多くの点があるとされ、組織管理の甘さや、カルテと保険料申請に「国際疾病分類コード」が用いられていないこと、医療看護の品質不足(免許のない看護師など)、病院建物の老朽化や消防設備不足などが指摘された。

気性のまっすぐなシスター・セルネオは、病院の組織構造の説明を評価委員から求められた時のことを思い出す。「どう答えればいいのかわからず、『聖母病院はフラットな組織構造です。誰もがいくつかの職務を兼ね、きちんと責任を負っています』と答えてしまいました」

そのため、夜も昼も評価制度対策に追われた。徹夜でカルテを整理する人もいれば、パソコンや消防のコースに通う人もいた。ベテラン看護師が試験に合格するよう、毎週末に北部から看護コースの先生を呼んだ。そうした努力を続け、3回目の評価でやっとパスしたのだ。

病院が泣いている

皮肉なことに1990〜2001年に聖母病院では6人のスタッフが次々と医療奉仕貢献賞を受賞し、受賞率の最も高い病院となった。それでも2003年には深刻な赤字でスタッフの給料も出せなくなり、ついに病院閉鎖かという事態になった。

陳世賢さんは病院が揺れた当時を振り返る。ある大手私立病院が聖母病院を買い取りたいと言ってきた。だがそれは病院設備と医師だけで、それ以外のスタッフ80名は不要だという。院長はもちろん断った。ある雨の日、真っ暗な病院の廊下には誰もおらず、天井から雨漏りの水がしたたっていた。命がつきる最後の1分まで医療に捧げたいと勤務していた骨科の施少偉医師は思わず「病院が泣いている」とため息をついたという(フィリピン籍華僑の施医師は2006年に癌になり、2008年に49歳で亡くなる1週間前まで診療を続けた)。

そんな存亡の危機を救ったのが、当時の病院にとって家長と言えた二人――着任したばかりの教会花蓮教区・黄兆明司教と、聖母病院元院長のシスター鄭雲だった。難関を乗り越えようとスタッフを励ますと同時に、運営転換への明確な方向を示したのである。それは、聖母病院の家庭的ムードと心のケアを重視する特色を生かし、台東で「ホスピス」と「健康促進」という医療の二大新興領域を進めるというものだった。

2004年、聖母病院は台東初のホスピス病棟を設立、ベテランの内科医である黄冠球さんと台北医学院内科医師の傅珊珊さんを迎えて運営し、同年には衛生署のホスピス病棟評価で優良病院に選ばれた。成功大学病院の趙可式博士は台湾の「ホスピスの母」と称されるが、博士は聖母病院のホスピスの質を日頃から公の場で賞賛している。この夏、中国の30の病院からなるホスピス視察団が台湾を訪れた際も、限られた日程の中「心と体のケア」の聖母病院は必ず訪れたいと要望した。

愛のリレー

見事に転換を果たした聖母病院は2005年から連続4年、台東県在宅サービス優等賞を受賞、2008年にも医療奉仕貢献賞団体賞に輝き、同賞初の団体受賞となった。

「違う角度から見れば、これは『おばかさん賞』です。おばかさんだけが、最も困難な環境を選び、頭のいい人が普通はしないようなことをするのです」と陳世賢さんは笑う。しかし、利益優先の資本主義社会では、このような馬鹿正直さこそが人の心を打つ。だからこそ同病院に寄せられる人的、物的資源は後を絶たない。

例えば5年前、耕莘;病院の糖尿病の権威であった林瑞祥教授は、毎月自費で飛行機で台東に来て1〜3日逗留し、聖母病院で糖尿病患者会の設立と糖尿病教育推進を手伝い、今ではここの専任医師になっている。2008年には国泰病院新生児救急治療室の喩永生・元主任が、癌で亡くなった施少偉院長の後任を引き受けた。翌年初めにも、康泰医療基金会事務局長であった陳良娟さんが20年余りのボランティア参加に終止符を打ち、正式に副院長に就任した。

ほかにも秘話は尽きない。台東で料理自慢の民宿を経営していた順子さんは2006年、陳良娟・副院長からの切なる招きを断りきれず(順子さんの民宿のアットホームなムードが良しとされた)、経営権12年のBOT方式という条件で、聖母病院の敷地内に健康センターを開くことを了承した。

驚くことに、完璧を求める順子さんの手にかかると、設計はますます豊富に、工期もますます長くなり、ついには民宿を売って3000万元を投入、2年後には当初の予定をはるかに上回る、聖堂のように立派な設備ができあがった。しかも「人助けを12年後に伸ばす必要などない」と、建物を病院に返還すると申し出た(病院はなんとか900万元をかき集め、彼の好意に感謝を示した)。今では、県民に低価格で有機野菜料理と健康講座を提供する「聖母健康会館」となっている。

ほかにも、園芸専門家の劉家麒さんは聖母病院の糖分コントロール講座に参加したのがきっかけで、2007年初めに自ら願い出て、4ヵ月かけて聖母病院に東屋や流れのある「癒しの花園」を作った。

おもしろいのは、彼らの中には敬虔な仏教徒やほかの宗教の信仰者もいることで、それでも家族のような思いで病院のために一肌脱いでいる。

「人々の役に立ちたいと願っていれば、そうした人や物事が集まってくるようです」最も「人をいったんつかんだら放さない」タイプの陳副院長はニコニコ笑いながら「こういうのをエネルギー凝縮とか、良性循環と言うのですね」と言った。

これらは、聖母病院が半世紀にわたって得てきた社会的信用の集積であり、社会で人道的な医療が求められている証拠であろう。だからこそ、2009年4月に聖母病院が医療財団法人となるための援助を募った際にも(1600万元余りの土地増価税も払う義務が生じた)、わずか8日で8900万元が集まったのである(目標の3000万元を大きく上回った)。

台東聖母病院の活動の場はすでに台東に限らず、また病院としての役割にもとどまらない。慈愛とヒューマニティのプロジェクトは今後も続く。

真愛燃燒半世紀:台東聖母醫院

文‧陳歆怡 圖‧莊坤儒

拜訪台東聖母醫院,你要有心理準備──所有人經常都在「外勤中」:

早上8點半,載著修女、醫師、護士各1名的居家照顧車已經在駛往泰源部落的路上,不久後,老人送餐車也準備開拔。上午10點,在金峰鄉嘉蘭村的日托關懷站,醫院社工員及芳療師正帶著數十位原住民阿嬤進行團康及保健按摩。下午,內科的林瑞祥醫師在社區進行糖尿病衛教,副院長陳良娟則悉心為遠來訪客導覽即將啟用的「健康農莊」及研習中心「培質院」,順便預約來年的健康促進課程……

如此朝氣蓬勃的景況,讓人很難想像,這家醫院過去7年內歷經了兩次關門危機,被專家判定「沒有條件活下去」。事實上,世界各地許多曾經照亮偏鄉、歷史悠久的教會醫院,近年或因經營不善或跟不上環境的變化而紛紛熄燈,連教友們都說:「是天主的旨意,要我們休息了。」

然而,這個運作體質更像家、醫護人員情同手足的「小」醫院,卻奇蹟地實現了艱難的重生與轉型,還把夢想越做越「大」──不僅服務腳蹤遍及幅員遼闊的台東縣,更立志成為整個台灣東部的安寧療護及健康促進中心。

故事得從半個世紀前,2位歐洲傳教士撒下的種子說起……


後山醫療的曙光

在聖母醫院隔壁,有一片幽靜的庭園,花樹掩映中有棟白色房舍,現仍住著4位年高七旬、視台東為第二故鄉的「天主教白冷外方傳教會」(以下簡稱白冷會)會士,長年低調地關懷著本地的原住民、外勞等弱勢族群乃至自然生態。

白冷會源自19世紀末法國神父巴拉爾在瑞士創辦的國際性傳教學校,依據會旨,在此完成培訓的成員除了要到沒有神職人員的外地去傳教,還必需儘量融入當地文化,為弱勢族群及邊緣人服務。

1953年10月,「白冷會」的兩位會士錫質平神父及司路加神父,從排斥外籍傳教士的共產中國遷徙到台灣台東,而後引來更多伙伴,他們除了到原住民部落宣講福音,也投入醫療、教育、社會關懷乃至語言及風俗研究等事業。

1961年,白冷會向海外募資,在台東市街上興建了「台東聖母醫院」(即如今院區內作為修女宿舍的2層樓小白樓及一座聖堂),一開始只有1個門診與4張病床。

當時台東僅有一家署立醫院,人員、設備不足,台籍醫師也鮮少願意留在後山服務。因此,早年聖母醫院的經費完全仰仗國外捐款及外籍信徒醫師的駐院奉獻,另邀請到兩位「聖母醫療傳教會」的愛爾蘭籍修女主持產科部門。

特別的是,由於台東地區族群多元,日常使用的語言複雜(包括國、閩、客、日語,以及6種原住民語言),因此,修士及修女們從一開始就致力於培訓本地的護佐,以便同時協助護理及翻譯工作。

由修女一手調教,服務年資超過40年的鐘光美、施秀英及綽號「大黃」的黃秋珍猶記得,早年(1970年代)薪資約是每月台幣4,000元,住宿及伙食都由醫院包辦,晚上9點設有門禁。修女每週為她們上2堂護理課、2堂英文課,白天則在診間擔任助手,打針、配藥、支援麻醉及接生樣樣都學。

在規律而緊湊的工作之餘,修士、修女們也會抽空安排自娛娛人的調劑,像是開車載十幾個小女生去兜風野餐,或是午休時間搭公車到美麗的杉原海濱游泳消暑。那段師徒緊密相依的時光,給她們最大的影響是:「學習到病人優先及愛的精神」。

別人不做的,我做!

1975年,源自法國的醫療福傳組織「仁愛修女會」接掌聖母醫院,當時在醫護人員努力下,聖母醫院已擴建為擁有30張病床的婦產專科醫院。

在仁愛會經營下,聖母醫院開展出另一項創舉,即是由來自美國的第二任院長馬克斐修女及1979年來台的艾珂瑛修女首開先鋒、至今不輟的居家照護服務。

在交通不便、城鄉資源差異頗大的1970年代,馬修女經常搭船到蘭嶼探視及宣導衛教知識,平時遇有蘭嶼達悟族人到醫院來看病,也會替他們安排吃住,然而有時碰到堅持「開放式」居住方式的族人,馬修女也會尊重他們的意願,於是醫院門口的大樹下經常可見到有人露營、野炊,醫院廚房也會出現飛魚等用來答謝的野味。

念護理時主修麻醉的艾修女,則是第一個開車跑遍山巔海角、在台東建立居家護理模式的人(她謙虛地說,這是因為當年唯有她會開車)。早年她常一個人開車跑一整天,車內裝著病歷資料、醫療器材及藥品,除了要找路辨方位,中途還要隨時停下來借用部落的教堂打電話回醫院,「一旦有緊急案例需要麻醉開刀,我就得立刻趕回去支援。」

在艾修女的服務對象中,常見家境困難的原住民,年紀輕輕就因酒醉駕車或疲勞駕駛,而不幸成為半身癱瘓的脊髓損傷者,因此,居家工作往往綜合了護理(除了清瘡、指導復健,有時甚至幫獨居者洗衣、清掃環境)、社工(例如尋找補助資源、協助子女就學),及心靈上的撫慰。

「修女們總是叮嚀大家,別人不去的,我們去;別人不做的,我們做!」2006年底加入成為生力軍的聖母醫院執行長陳世賢解釋,這也是為什麼,別的醫院視為畏途、成本又高的居家照護,會在聖母醫院手中越做越大──服務範圍北從台東、花蓮交界的長濱鄉,南至台東、屏東交界的達仁鄉這段綿延190公里的海岸線,以及約需1.5小時車程才能到達的山區部落,再加上外島的蘭嶼、綠島,每年共約150位案例,都由聖母醫院居家團隊負責。

值得一提的是,聖母醫院至今「不肯」依照健保規定,另向服務案主收取一趟150~500元不等的「交通自費額」,「免得窮人為了省錢,強忍需要不向外求援,」艾修女說。

修女也瘋狂

1990年代,隨著全民健保開辦,免除了大部分民眾就醫的經濟障礙,但偏鄉的社會服務與醫療仍有很大的改善空間。

以台東縣而言,根據1995年的統計顯示,該縣每10萬人口死亡率(無論是哪一項死因)比台灣地區高出很多,罹患惡性腫瘤的人口比率竄升速度亦是全台之冠,如今每年平均仍有600位癌末病人,平均餘命則比台北市民少了10年以上。

此外,台東縣的青壯年人口因意外事故死亡的人數,以及罹患心臟血管或腎臟方面的慢性病症患者比率皆居高不下,表示有許多人經年累月得背負沈重的生活壓力及心理困擾,也顯示社經不平等對「健康」的妨害甚鉅。

在此同時,被貧苦大眾視為身心靈安定力量的聖母醫院,自90年代中期開始卻也顯露入不敷出、「跟不上時代變化」的窘態。

陳世賢解釋:首先,依隨天主教的「自立自養」政策,聖母醫院自1980年代後逐漸斷絕海外募款,本土捐款卻始終極少;其次,在國內醫療體制掀起「企業化」與「市場化」潮流下,公益性格的聖母醫院連原先的產科強項都漸漸動搖。

獲頒2003年度「衛生署」全國醫療奉獻獎、現年76歲的菲律賓籍修女蕭玉鳴則回憶道,1990年代「醫院評鑑制度」實施後,大夥兒還得面對「調整醫院體質」的嚴苛挑戰:當時評鑑結果指出聖母醫院必需改進多項「缺失」,包括:組織管理有欠秩序、病歷資料及申報保費未按「國際疾病編碼」加以分類建檔、醫護品質有待提升(包括護士的「無照」問題需解決)、醫院建物老舊需加強消防設施等。

個性耿直的蕭修女說,那時評鑑委員要求說明醫院的組織架構,「我都不知道要怎麼回答,只能說,聖母醫院是『扁平化管理』,每個人都得身兼數職,負責到底!」

她也記得,那段時期修女們日夜奔忙,有人熬夜整理病歷檔案、有人學習電腦、有人去上消防課;為了協助資深護理人員順利考照,還邀請北部護理補習班每週末前來授課……,種種努力,終於在第3次評鑑時達到了改進要求。

醫院哭了?轉型大考驗

諷刺的是,從1990年至2001年,聖母醫院陸續有6位同仁榮獲「醫療奉獻獎」,是全台灣「獲獎率」最高的醫院,然而,卻在2003年禁不住嚴重虧損,連醫護人員薪水都發不出來,而終於來到存廢抉擇的關卡。

陳世賢描述了當時風雨飄搖的氣息:某大型私立醫院表示想「收購」聖母醫院,但是只要醫院硬體和醫師,其餘80名員工都不要,院長當然不答應;某個下雨天,漆黑的醫院長廊裡空無一人,院外下著雨,天花板也滴著水,全心奉獻、願意堅持到生命最後一分鐘的骨科醫師施少偉也忍不住嘆息:「醫院在哭了。」(施醫師是菲籍華僑,他在2006年診斷罹癌,2008年以49歲壯年辭世,過世前一週仍在看診。)

值此危急存亡之際,幸好當時醫院的兩位大家長──甫上任的天主教會花蓮教區黃兆明主教與前聖母醫院院長鄭雲修女──在勉勵同仁共度難關之餘,提出了明確的轉型方向:善用聖母醫院原有充滿「家庭感」的環境,以及看重心靈療癒的工作手法,在台東推動「安寧療護」與「健康促進」兩大新興醫療領域。

2004年,聖母醫院成立了台東第一間安寧病房,延請到資深開業內科醫師黃冠球及前台北醫學院內科醫師傅珊珊共同主持,同年榮獲衛生署安寧病房評鑑優良醫院。素有台灣「安寧療護之母」之稱的成大醫院趙可式博士,則經常公開讚美台東聖母醫院的安寧療護品質。今年夏天,由中國30家醫院組成的安寧療護考察團即將來台取經,在有限時程中,也指定走訪強調身心靈整合的聖母醫院安寧病房。

愛的接力

順利轉型的聖母醫院,從2005年起,連續4年榮獲台東縣居家照顧服務優等獎,2008年更獲得第18屆醫療奉獻獎的團體獎,是該獎創設以來,唯一以團體名義受到表揚的醫院。

「換個角度來看,這其實是『傻瓜獎』,只有傻瓜才會堅持留在最困難的環境中,去做一般聰明人不願意做的事,」陳世賢笑著說。然而,在功利導向的資本主義社會,這種傻瓜精神卻愈顯珍貴動人,更因此捲動源源不絕的人才與資源前來投效。

舉例而言,5年前,耕莘醫院糖尿病權威林瑞祥教授,每個月自費飛來台東停留1~3天,協助醫院成立糖尿病友團體及推廣衛教,如今已是專任醫師;2008年底,前國泰醫院新生兒加護病房主任喻永生,自願接下癌逝的施少偉醫師的院長棒子;隔年初,前康泰醫療基金會執行長陳良娟,從二十多年的義工身份,正式轉為副院長。

意想不到的「奇人軼事」還很多:2006年,開民宿也善於烹飪的台東人順子,禁不住陳良娟的百般邀請(只因屬意順子民宿那種「親和、放鬆」的氛圍),答應循BOT模式,以換取12年經營權為條件,替聖母醫院在院區空地上建造一間健康中心。

沒想到,求好心切的順子,為了讓這家夢想中的健康會館和醫院融合無間,不僅設計圖越畫越豐富、工期越拉越長,甚至還賣掉民宿自籌3,000萬元資金,2年後蓋出一棟遠比當初約定來得精緻宏大、宛如「聖堂」一般的空間;更沒想到,順子竟主動提議無條件「解約」:「救人何必拖到12年後?」就這樣瀟灑地將建物「歸還」給醫院(院方最後還是籌措到900萬元,以答謝他的慷慨),造就如今以便宜價格向縣民供應有機料理與健康課程的「聖母健康會館」。

再舉一例:2007年初,因參加一場糖尿病「控糖班」活動而跟聖母醫院結緣的病友、同時也是園藝專家的劉家麒,自願花4個月來聖母醫院「做工」,完成了有流水、涼亭及盎然綠意的「心靈療癒花園」,讓久臥病床的患者或是街坊鄰居,都可以就近小憩靜心。

有趣的是,這群志同道合的伙伴中,也有虔誠的佛教徒或其他宗教信仰者,彼此卻建立起由衷的默契與家人般的情感。

「只要我們許下真正有益眾人的美好心願,好像就會有『對』的人與事浮現,」最會「黏」人的副院長陳良娟笑容可掬地說:「這是一種能量凝聚的過程,也是善的循環。」

這一股持續勃發的能量,不僅源自半世紀以來聖母醫院所奠定的社會信任,也反映今日台灣對尋求醫學人文典範的渴望。也因此,當2009年4月,聖母醫院為能順利成立醫療財團法人(包括必需繳納1,600多萬元的土地增值稅)而向外界求援時,竟能在短短8天內籌募到8,900萬元(遠超過原定目標3,000萬元)的愛心捐款!

邁向璀璨新局的台東聖母醫院,其實早就不只屬於台東,也不只是「病院」,而是一處鮮活展示慈愛與人本精神的良心工程。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!