Bring Us This Day Our Daily Bread

:::

2013 / 8月

Sam Ju /photos courtesy of Chuang Kung-ju /tr. by Jonathan Barnard


According to conservative estimates, in the cities of Tai­pei and New Tai­pei about NT$20 million worth of charitable donations of bread are made each year. In a stack of single loaves, that bread would reach the height of 14 Taipei 101s.


Have you ever wondered where bakeries’ unsold bread goes every day?

On a Sunday evening at Song­shan Station in Tai­pei, travelers are scurrying every which way. At the Bread First Bakery on basement level one, the staff are closing up.

Taking all loaves

The Chinese Youth Peace Corps (CYPC) is a volunteer service corps that was established in 1996. The following year, under the leadership of executive director Chen Da-der, it launched a food bank. Its volunteers go to participating bakeries and baked-goods shops and collect bread that didn’t sell the day it was baked, which they then deliver to various social welfare organizations that provide food to disadvantaged members of society.

In 16 years the number of bakeries working with CYPC has grown from a handful to over 100, and the number of volunteers has grown to 350. Every year the program helps nearly 20,000 people, including elderly people living alone, the physically and mentally disabled, and single-parent families, via various service stations in Tai­pei and ­Ban­qiao.

Lian Qichang, a 60-year-old volunteer, goes to the First Bread branch at Song­shan every Sunday night to pick up leftover bread. On the evening he is being interviewed for this story, he picks up 70–80 items. There are buns stuffed or topped with chopped scallions, corn, ham, butter, cheese or garlic, as well as five or six plain white loaves suited for making toast.

Next, he places all of the bread into blue bags. After it is wrapped, he pulls out half a dozen carrying bags that had been folded to pocket size, shakes them open, and piles in the bread.

With so much bread left over, couldn’t he just take half? “I can’t let the good intentions of the shop go to waste,” he says. The six bags of bread lie on the floor like six heavy quilts.

Hurrying to arrive before 10:00, he delivers the bread to the Sunshine Gas Station, so that its workers, who are mostly disabled, will be able to bring something home to eat tonight. Another of Lian’s targets is the Sunshine Foundation’s car wash.

Connecting resources is connecting love

According to the CYPC, from January to May of this year they helped 10,000 people in 2600 households with donations of bread valued at NT$15 million.

Shijie, 18, works at the gas station and loves bread. ­Every Sunday night he eagerly anticipates the arrival of “Uncle Bread.”

The gas station’s manager explains that some of the young workers have unusual family situations and need special care. If those workers don’t have a shift on the day the bread arrives, the station will put some of it aside for them in the refrigerator.

On the evening of our interview, Lian gives two bags of bread to the gas station. Of the remainder, he brings a portion to the Jian­jun Group Home on Tai­pei City’s Ding­zhou Road, and a portion he takes home and puts in his fridge, before delivering it to the Sunshine Carwash the following morning, so the disadvantaged kids on its staff can have some breakfast.

The Jian­jun Group Home has more than 20 mentally handicapped children, mostly from low and low-middle income families. For the last two years Lian has been regularly delivering donated bread there on Sundays. The home’s director Chen ­Yunyu says that its residents all know that the bread has been donated, but they don’t view it as “something other people don’t want.”

“Connecting resources is connecting love,” says Chen.

Saving face

Volunteers play a key role in distributing donated bread. Tu Yong­xian, who was born in 1976, is one of the younger volunteers.

He mainly works at Tai­pei City’s low-income housing projects managed by the Department of Social Welfare. Of those who receive his bread, 70% are elderly living alone and 30% are single-parent families. In all they constitute about 100 low-income and lower-middle-income households. In Wan­hua District, which has Tai­pei City’s lowest average income, he comes across a great variety of circumstances that are often at odds with images of the urban poor.

He notes that some households in the projects simultaneously receive child, family and disability support from the government. He has seen lower-middle-income households who own fancy cars and whose children carry smart phones. Tu refuses to deliver bread to households that he feels are abusing the social welfare system.

He also declines to deliver to drug addicts, to heavy drinkers and to those who fight and cause trouble.

Twice a week Tu drives his motorcycle to bakeries near the Tai­pei Railway Station to pick up leftover bread. All those who receive the bread are economically disadvantaged, but that status in itself is not sufficient to receive it.

The first time Tu delivered to one of his new households this year the parent refused the bread, shouting, “I didn’t ask for these deliveries.” Tu decided just to leave the bread hanging on the door knob. Not long afterwards, the bread was tossed down from the home on the fifth floor.

After being refused there several times, Tu no longer rings the bell to announce himself. He has changed his tactic to simply leaving the bread at the front door, so that the family can bring in the bread at a suitable time.

“You’ve got to consider their sense of self respect,” says Tu. “The poorer people are, the more they fear losing face.”

Saving on disposal costs

Producing too much bread easily leads to waste—of ingredients, water and electricity. It’s all good and well to view surplus bread as a means to provide charity, but shouldn’t bakeries, while continuing to make donations, also try to prevent unnecessary waste? They shouldn’t think, “We don’t have to worry about making too much, because we can just donate any extra.”

Upon receiving nearly 100 loaves of bread, one staffer at the Sunshine Gas Station states that he doesn’t complain about getting “too much” and doesn’t worry that they can’t eat it all, because disadvantaged ­individuals come from disadvantaged families, and everyone receiving aid has a lot of people behind them who also need help. The hope is that many more bakeries will participate.

Yang Zhi’an, the director of the business department at the Sunshine Foundation, used to manage a branch of the Children Are Us bakery, where he arranged bread donations.

Yang believes that making too much bread is wasteful. But in order to adhere to the bakery’s marketing strategy of attracting customers into the store with well-stocked shelves, surplus production was regarded as a necessary evil.

“When bread comes out of the oven at chain bakeries, if you can’t fill up the shelves, business will suffer,” he says.

From the standpoint of consumer behavior, this analysis makes sense. Customers often wrongly believe that if shelves are largely empty, then it must be because the bread there is stale and no one wants to buy it.

Consequently, Yang explains, chain bakeries usually expect to lose about 12%. If they bake 100 loaves, they expect at least 12 of them will go to waste.

Drawing from his previous experience as a bakery manager, Yang points out, “If you cut the rate of waste down to 5%, you’d lose 30% of your business.”

Evelyn Wang, project manager at CYPC’s food bank, observes that some bakeries limit production, working toward greater efficiency. Sun­Merry Bakery is one such example.

In fact, disposing of waste bread is itself an expense. In Yang’s estimation, turning over surplus bread to a food bank every day could save a baked-goods shop as much as NT$10,000 per month.

The situation regarding leftover bread varies greatly from nation to nation. According to a UK survey, British households throw away 4.4 million metric tons of bread each year, meaning that for every three loaves that are purchased, one goes to waste. Turkey produces 6 million excess loaves of bread every day, so that the amount of money wasted in a year would be enough to build 500 schools.

Bread has become an important part of the Taiwanese diet, but to date no one has formally tried to put a dollar figure on the waste.

If the amount of donated bread in Tai­pei City and New Tai­pei City could create a stack the size of 14 Tai­pei 101s, then the amount of tossed bread is likely to be several times larger. Is not that thrown-away bread the true waste of food and bakers’ love?

相關文章

近期文章

繁體中文 日文

愛心麵包限時送

文‧朱立群 圖‧莊坤儒

捐公益、助弱勢,小麵包也能有偉大貢獻。保守估計,台北市、新北市每年收到的愛心麵包,金額超過台幣2,000萬元,堆起來比14座台北101大樓還高。


可曾想過,店家每晚賣不掉的麵包,都收去哪兒了?

周日晚上的松山火車站,旅客大廳人來人往,位於地下一樓的「麵包優先」烘焙坊鐵門拉下一半,準備打烊。

60歲的志工連其昌,頭戴棒球帽,肩上背著兩只寫有「中國青年和平團食物銀行」的藍色布袋,在附近待命。

他低頭看錶,8點50分,立刻起身拉開麵包店後門進入,向店員示意後,開始打包。十幾分鐘後,前一刻堆滿三層商品貨架的麵包,一掃而空。

「禮拜天剩的麵包很多,許多需要幫助的人都吃得到。」這是連其昌當下心裡唯一的念頭。

麵包全都收
不讓店家愛心失落

中國青年和平團是1996年成立的志工服務團體,隔年在執行長陳大德的點子下,推出食物銀行,由志工前往合作店家收取當天賣不完的麵包,分送給照顧弱勢團體的社福機構。

16年來,與和平團合作的愛心麵包店從個位數成長至一百多家,志工達350人;以台北市及新北市板橋地區為服務據點,每年濟助近兩萬人,包括經濟狀況不好的獨居老人、身心障礙者、單親家庭兒童等。

連其昌是台北市松山、信義區志工隊隊長,每周日晚上固定到松山火車站內的麵包優先收麵包。他熟練地把麵包整盤倒入事先備好的透明塑膠袋之後,在袋口打結,以防運送過程中麵包暴露在外。

他裝了滿滿十幾包,約有七、八十個麵包,光是包餡的,就有蔥花、玉米、火腿、奶酥、起司、大蒜、比薩等口味,這還不包括店家事先裝袋的五、六條白土司。

這一袋袋的麵包裝滿了連其昌帶來的藍色布袋。之後,他再掏出三、四個折成口袋大小的備用大塑膠袋,抖開,繼續放進成袋的麵包。

算一算,一共6大袋麵包,綁好放在地上,一個人搬,一趟根本搬不完。

因此,連其昌緊急託人幫忙提兩袋,他本人則騎摩托車運載。他160公分出頭的身高,放在腳踏板處的兩袋麵包堆起來已經高過下巴,左、右手把再各掛一袋。

天空下起雨來,他打開座椅,拿出雨衣覆蓋麵包。

趕在十點前,他必須把麵包送到市民大道旁、提供身心障礙者就業的陽光加油站,才能趕上結束晚班作業的員工帶回家,並讓大夜班員工填飽肚子。

連結資源
就是連結愛

陽光基金會經營的加油站與洗車中心,都是連其昌服務的個案。根據和平團的統計,光是今年1~5月,已有一萬人及兩千六百多戶家庭接受愛心麵包的濟助;捐贈的麵包,金額達台幣1,500萬元,堆起來的高度超過10座台北101大樓。

今年18歲的士傑是陽光加油站的員工,周日夜晚非常期待「麵包叔叔」的到來。

加油站主管表示,有些孩子家境特殊,特別需要照顧,如果他們當天沒排班,會先把一些愛心麵包冰起來,隔日上班再微波加熱讓他們享用。

這一晚,連其昌把兩袋麵包送給了加油站,其餘的,一部分送到位於台北市汀州路的健軍團體家庭,一部分先帶回家冷藏,隔日清晨再送去陽光洗車中心給孩子當早餐。

由育成社會福利基金會辦理的健軍團體家庭,住有二十多位智能障礙的朋友,大多來自低收入或中低收入的家庭。他們周間白天在社福機構庇護就業,晚上回團體家庭學習獨立生活,主任陳雲玉表示,其中有幾位已沒有家,必須整年都住在團體家庭。

早年由志工自行到鄰近店家取回愛心麵包,店家停業後,有段時期少了麵包的補充。去年起,連其昌固定周日送來麵包,延續社會的善意與溫暖。

每周一次送來的麵包,都由社工老師指導冰存、調理,譬如夏天早餐吃土司夾馬鈴薯蛋沙拉,大受歡迎。

團體家庭的住民都知道麵包是店家的愛心,不會有「那是人家不要的」的想法。「資源的連結,就是愛心的連結,」陳雲玉說。

越窮越愛面子
不是人人都領情

志工是和平團食物銀行傳遞愛心麵包的關鍵,年紀五、六十歲的比比皆是,65年次的涂永憲算是異數。

他有8年送麵包的經驗,目前擔任萬華區志工隊隊長,以台北市社會局辦理的福民平價住宅為主要據點,發放對象7成是獨居老人,3成是單親家庭,共100戶低收入與中低收入戶。在台北市平均收入最低的萬華區,他看到了扭曲的受助者形象。

他說,有人同時接受政府兒童、家庭,以及殘障津貼的補助,區區3,000元的老人津貼他們根本看不起。

看過開名牌轎車的中低收入戶,也看過貧戶小孩人手一支智慧手機,涂永憲拒絕送麵包給濫用福利補助的個案。

此外,由於年輕時血氣方剛、加入幫派,洗心革面做志工之後,對於吸毒、酗酒、打架鬧事者,他也不送。

一個禮拜兩次,涂永憲騎摩托車到Yamazaki山崎麵包台大醫院分店,及台北火車站附近的優仕紳烘焙屋載回愛心麵包分贈。

然而,雖然受贈者都是經濟弱勢,但對於愛心麵包的捐贈,並不是每人都能領情。

今年有一個邊緣戶的新個案,住有一對姊妹,其中一位還帶著小孩。涂永憲童年有過挨餓的經驗,長大後,最不忍看到小孩缺乏照顧,因此主動送愛心麵包上門。然而,屋主對此大為不悅,對他大吼「又沒叫你送」,拒絕開門接受好意;涂永憲把麵包掛在門把上,過沒多久,麵包被該戶人家從五樓丟下。

被拒絕幾次之後,涂永憲不再按門鈴,他在門口放下麵包就離開,慢慢的,受贈戶也不再拒愛心於千里之外。

「必須顧及他們的尊嚴,越窮困的人,越愛面子。」涂永憲提出他的觀察。

生產過多的麵包容易形成浪費,遑論烘焙過程用掉的雞蛋、麵粉原物料及水、電。把麵包當作濟助的資源,立意良善,但麵包店做愛心的同時,必須避免製造額外的浪費,不應本末倒置地認為「過剩的,反正可以捐出去」。

收到近百個愛心麵包,一位陽光加油站職員表示「不嫌多」,不擔心吃不完,因為弱勢的個人往往來自弱勢的家庭,每一位受助者的背後還有許多家人需要幫助,希望能有更多店家參與。

不過,把賣不完的新鮮麵包捐作公益的店家,畢竟目前仍是少數;知名連鎖店與大賣場打烊後報廢麵包之事,時有所聞。

免花錢報廢
麵包店月省1萬元

陽光基金會事業部經理楊智安,以前擔任喜憨兒烘焙屋店長時,也曾捐贈愛心麵包。

「連鎖麵包店剛出爐的麵包,如果不能鋪滿整個架子,生意一定變差。」他認為,超量生產造成浪費,但在追求麵包賣相、店面擺設的行銷策略下,為了吸引客人上門,烘焙業者大量,甚至過量生產,已被視為必要之惡。

楊智安表示,連鎖麵包店通常把物損率控制在12%左右,亦即烤出100個麵包,其中至少有12個注定要報廢。

根據過去管理麵包店的經驗,楊智安指出,「物損率如果壓到5%,營業額起碼掉3成。」

在成本與收益之間,為了追求最大淨利,烘焙業者必須精算。和平團食物銀行專案經理王薪如觀察,有些店家節制產量,反而讓進、出貨管理更有效率,聖瑪莉麵包店即是一例。

其實,處理報廢的麵包也是一筆支出。楊智安估計,把當天賣不完的麵包交由食物銀行轉送需要幫助的人,一舉兩得,每月至少可幫店家節省1萬元的清運費。

浪費麵包的狀況,各國迥異。英國一份家戶浪費調查顯示,英國家庭每年丟棄440萬公噸的麵包,平均每買3個就會丟棄1個;一份土耳其烘焙業者公會6月發布的報告指出,該國麵包店「每天」報廢的過剩麵包高達600萬條,每年浪費掉的金額足以興建500所學校。

在台灣,麵包已是國人的主食之一,但浪費的數字一直是不被說破的秘密。

如果台北市、新北市一百多個愛心店家捐贈的麵包一年可堆出14座台北101,那麼,被丟棄的數量,絕對遠勝於此。浪費掉的麵包可以量化,浪費掉的愛心卻無以估算。

新鮮なパンと思いやりを届ける

文・朱立群 写真・荘坤儒

小さなパンひとつで社会に貢献できる。台北市と新北市では、控えめに見積もっても毎年2000万元を超えるパンが寄付されており、それらを積み上げると、台北101の14倍の高さを超えるという。


パン屋の閉店時に売れ残ったパンはどこへいくのか、疑問に思ったことはないだろうか。

日曜の夜、人々が行き交う台北市松山駅の駅ビル地下一階にあるベーカリー「麺包優先」ではシャッターが半分おろされ、閉店の準備をしていた。

60歳のボランティア連其昌さんは「中国青年和平団フードバンク」と書かれた青いバッグを肩にかけ、近くで待機している。時計が8時50分を指すと、彼は店の裏口を開けて店員に声をかけ、棚のパンを袋に入れていく。「日曜日は売れ残りが多いので、多くの生活困窮者が助かります」と言う。

パン屋の思いやりを大切に

中国青年和平団は1996年に設立されたボランティア団体で、設立2年目の時に陳大徳・執行長のアイディアでフードバンクの活動を開始した。協力してくれる店舗から売れ残ったパンを引き取り、それを弱者福祉団体へ届けるのである。

16年来、和平団にパンを寄付するパン屋は100軒余りまで増え、ボランティアは350人に達する。彼らは台北市と新北市板橋区に拠点を設け、2万人近い人々にパンを提供している。主に経済的に困窮する高齢者や障害者、一人親家庭などである。

連其昌さんは、台北市の松山・信義区ボランティア隊の隊長で、毎週日曜日の夜、松山駅構内の「麺包優先」へパンを引き取りに行く。彼は、慣れた手つきでビニール袋にパンを入れ、輸送中にパンが外部に触れないように、きちんと封をする。

10袋いっぱいに詰められたパンは70~80個はあり、ネギパン、コーンパン、ハムパン、クリームパンなど、あらゆる種類がある。さらに店があらかじめ用意しておいた食パンが5~6本加えられる。

連其昌さんはこれらを青いバッグと大きなレジ袋に入れたが、一人では運びきれないので緊急にサポートを呼び、彼自身はスクーターでパンを運ぶ。足もとに2袋、左右のハンドルに1袋ずつかけ、雨が降れば、レインコートをパンにかけて守る。

物資が心を結ぶ

10時までに、心身障害者が働く市民大道沿いの陽光ガソリンスタンドへ届けなければならないのだ。10時に退社する従業員はパンを持ち帰り、交代で出勤してくる従業員はパンで腹ごしらえする。

陽光基金会が経営するガソリンスタンドと洗車センターはすべて連其昌さんの担当だ。和平団の統計によると、今年の1~5月だけで1万人と2600世帯がパンの支給を受けている。寄付されたパンの金額は1500万元分に上り、それらを積み重ねると台北101の10倍の高さになるという。

陽光ガソリンスタンドで働く18歳の士傑さんは、毎週日曜の夜に「パンのおじさん」が来てくれるのを楽しみにしている。管理職によると、これらの子供たちは家庭にそれぞれ困難を抱えており、特にケアが必要だという。日曜日に勤務がない従業員のためにパンの一部は冷蔵庫に入れ、翌日レンジで温めて食べているそうだ。

この日、連其昌さんは2袋分のパンをガソリンスタンドに収め、それ以外は台北市汀州路にある健軍団体家庭に届け、さらに残りは家に持ち帰って冷蔵保存し、翌朝、陽光洗車センターへ届けた。

育成社会福祉基金会が運営する健軍団体家庭には知的障害者が20人余り暮らしており、その多くは低所得世帯の出身だ。彼らは昼間は障害者を雇用する社会福祉機構で働き、夜は団体家庭で自立を学ぶ。ここの陳雲玉主任によると、何人かは帰る家がなく、一年中ここで暮らしているという。

以前は近所のパン屋へ売れ残りをもらいに行っていたが、その店が閉店してしまい、昨年から連さんが毎週日曜日に届けてくれるようになった。

週に1回届けられるパンは、ソーシャルワーカーが冷蔵保存して調理して出す。食パンはポテトと卵のサンドイッチにすると大人気だ。

団体家庭の住民は、これらのパンが店の思いやりであることを知っていて、「不要になったもの」という考えはない。「資源のつながりが思いやりのつながりなのです」と陳雲玉主任は言う。

貧しい人ほどメンツを気にする

和平団フードバンクの命はボランティアだ。大部分が50~60代だが、涂永憲さんは1976年生まれだ。

彼はすでに8年もボランティアを続けており、今は台北市万華区の隊長で、台北市社会局が運営する福民平価住宅を担当している。7割は一人暮らしの高齢者、3割は一人親家庭、計100世帯の中低所得層である。台北市内で平均収入が最も低い万華区で、彼は支給を受ける人々の歪んだ現状を見てきた。

その話によると、児童手当や家庭補助、障害者手当などの支給を同時に受け、3000元の老人手当は額が少ないと見下す人もいる。高級車を乗り回す低所得者もいれば、子供全員がスマホをもっている生活困窮者もいる。涂永憲さんは、こうした福祉を乱用する人々にはパンを配送しないことにしている。

若い頃は喧嘩早くてヤクザの仲間に入っていたが、後に心を入れ替えてボランティアを始めた彼は、麻薬やアルコールに依存したり、喧嘩ばかりしている人にはパンを届けない。

彼は週に2回、ヤマザキの台湾大学病院支店と台北駅付近の優仕紳烘焙屋に行ってパンを引き取り、生活困窮者に配るのだが、パンの寄付を受け入れようとしない人もいる。

今年、低所得世帯認定すれすれの1組の姉妹と子供の世帯にパンを届け始めた。涂永憲も子供の頃に空腹に苦しんだ経験があるので、子供が心配で届け始めたのだ。ところが、パンを届けると姉妹は怒り、ドアを開けようとしなかった。パンをドアノブにかけておくと5階からパンが投げ捨てられた。

何回か拒絶された後、彼は黙ってパンを置いていくようにし、少しずつ思いやりのパンを受け入れてもらった。「彼らの尊厳に配慮する必要があります。貧しい人ほどメンツを重んじますから」と言う。

作り過ぎたパンが売れ残ると、使った卵も小麦粉も、水も電気も無駄になってしまう。それを人助けの資源とするのは良いのだが、「余ったら寄付すればいい」というので、かえって作り過ぎて無駄が増えることがあってはならない。

100個近いパンの配布を受けている陽光ガソリンスタンドの職員は「どんなに多くても多過ぎることはない」と言う。弱者の多くは生活困窮世帯の出身で、家族も食糧を必要としているからだ。

ただ、パンを寄付する店はまだ少数で、大型スーパーなどでは閉店後に廃棄用トラックが回収していると聞く。

陽光基金会事業部の楊智安・経理は、かつて喜憨児ベーカリーで店長をしていた時にはパンの寄付をする側だった。「ベーカリーでは、棚いっぱいにパンが並んでいないと売れ行きに影響するのです」と言う。マーケティング戦略で、作り過ぎと分かっていても棚を埋めるために作り続け、それが必要悪になっているのである。チェーン店では廃棄率を12%ほどに抑えるようにしているが、それを5%まで下げると、売上は逆に3割下がるという。

コストと売上の間でベーカリーは緻密な計算を求められる。和平団の王薪如・マネージャーによると、SunMerryのように生産量を抑えて入出荷管理の効率を上げている店もあるという。

パンの廃棄処理費も少なからぬ支出である。フードバンクへ寄付すれば一挙両得で、1店舗当たり月に1万元以上の処理費節約になる。

パンの浪費状況は国によって異なる。イギリスの調査によると、同国の家庭では年に440万トンのパンを廃棄しており、3個に1個は捨てていることになる。トルコの業界による6月の報告では、売れ残りのパンが「毎日」600万本廃棄されており、その金額で学校が500校建てられるという。

台湾ではパンの浪費に関するデータは公にされていない。台北市と新北市でパンを寄付している100余店だけで台北101の14倍の高さになるのだから、全台湾で廃棄される量はどれほどになるのか。それが思いやりの心とともに人々の役に立てば、どんなにいいことだろう。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!