The Lingering Sound of the Strings

Guqin Maker Lin Li-cheng
:::

2018 / March

Cathy Teng /photos courtesy of Chuang Kung-ju /tr. by Phil Newell


The gu­qin is a seven-stringed fretless tradi­tional Chinese musical instrument in the zither family. In 2003, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization announced that the gu­qin and its music would be added to the organ­iza­tion’s Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. But more than two ­decades earlier, in 1977, a performance by gu­qin master Guan ­Pinghu of the piece “Flowing Water” was included on the two gold-plated phonograph records carried into outer space by NASA’s Voyager space probes, to convey mankind’s greetings to any intelligent extraterrestrial life forms that may find them.

We don’t know if any extra­terres­trials have listened to “Flowing Water” as yet, but Lin Li-­cheng was so moved by hearing the piece played on this ancient instrument that he embarked on a new career devoted to making, repairing and restoring gu­qin.


 

Lin Li-­cheng was formerly captain of a high-seas fishing vessel. In his long years at sea, Lin had heard the song “Flowing Water” many times. But one day he heard the melody played on a gu­qin, and from it he felt the majesty of flowing water. The sound of the instrument evoked memories of his life at sea, and his feelings of helplessness, terror and awe when buffeted by wind and waves, at the mercy of fate.

He was attracted to the sound of the gu­qin back then, but he only turned his hand to making the instruments because of a request from a friend. There has not been much change in the shape of the gu­qin since the Tang Dynasty (618‡907): it consists of two pieces of wood, one forming the top soundboard and the other the base, with the space between them acting as a resonance chamber; and it has seven strings. Lin, who had a foundation in woodworking and lacquerware, felt that he should be able to make a gu­qin, so he began studying ancient texts on the subject.

Lin, now in his 80s, has devoted most of his life to “hewing” gu­qin, as his craft is termed in Chinese. In 2009, he was named a “Tai­pei City cultural heritage skills preservationist,” becoming the first hewer of gu­qin to be officially recognized.

Good wood makes for good tone

The tone of a gu­qin is determined by the wood, and old wood is the best. To find good material, when he was young and had time off from fishing, Lin would often go deep into the mountains, following rivers in search of fallen trees. He explains that when wood lies in water the resins, proteins and saccharides are washed away, leaving large gaps in the wood cells, which makes for better resonance.

Once, while following Hua­lien’s Liwu River upstream, he came upon a withered tree trunk lying in the river, that he thought would be ideal material for making guqin. Saw in hand, he plunged under the water. After many days’ effort, struggling against the rapid current and the resistance of the water, he finally succeeded in sawing off a length of the wood. He eventually made two guqin out of this wood, one of which became the instrument he is most satisfied with to this day. He named it “Gu­jian­quan,” which means “spring of an ancient mountain stream.” Since Gu­jian­quan changed hands, Lin has never had the chance to see it again, but he has a wish: “My shaping and lacquering skills at that time weren’t good enough. I’ve always hoped that Gu­jian­quan might come back to me, so that I could make it a little better.”

As Lin grew older, his body was no longer able to take the strain of going into the mountains. After the opening up of relations between Taiwan and mainland China, Lin switched to getting old wood from the mainland. He says that materials that do not appeal to others can be treasures in his eyes, and that taking wood that others have rejected, and using one’s skills to transform it into a gu­qin of exquisite quality, is the most fascinating part of his craft.

Slow and painstaking work

Lin learned most of the steps in the process of making gu­qin from ancient texts. He says that the techniques passed down from ancient times have undergone little change, but by researching them he understands where every step in the process comes from, and from there he can improve them. For example, the soundboard of the gu­qin is usually made from the wood of the Chinese parasol tree (Firmiana simplex) or the Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata), because these are relatively soft and flexible; for the base, on the other hand, almost any softwood or hardwood will do.

The ancient texts record that you must apply a finish to a gu­qin, and Lin does this in practice. He buys deer antler from a Chinese medicine shop; after grinding it into a powder, he mixes it with raw lacquer to make deer-antler varnish. Lin explains that if you look at particles of deer antler under a microscope, you will see that they have a structure like snowflakes, with many gaps inside them. When they are mixed into lacquer and applied to the body of a gu­qin, each particle assists the acoustics and resonance of the instrument.

The varnish also seals the wood surface against contact with the air, thereby slowing down any warping or weathering of the wood and so maintaining the smoothness of the soundboard.

After the deer-antler varnish is applied evenly to its body, the gu­qin must be hung up to dry in a dark place for 20‡30 days, until the varnish is completely dry. Then the surface is polished smooth using a wetted whetstone. This process of varnishing and wet polishing is carried out three times. It takes a year and a half to make a high-quality gu­qin, and cutting any corners is not an option.

Step by step, Lin Li-­cheng has passed on these insights, techniques and attitudes to his son Lin Fa and his students. From the time Lin completed his first gu­qin in 1974, 22 years passed before he felt his technique was mature enough to offer classes, which he started doing in 1996. To date he has had more than 60 apprentices, including some from as far away as Hong Kong, who have come to learn to “hew gu­qin.”

Restoring ancient sounds

As Lin’s reputation as an instrument maker spread in the gu­qin community, people began seeking him out to repair and restore gu­qin. He has restored many world-­famous instruments, including the Yuan-­Dynasty gu­qin “Xue­ye­bing,” in the collection of the National Palace Museum; the Tang-Dynasty instrument “­Tongya,” belonging to famous gu­qin player ­Zhang Qing­zhi; the Song-­Dynasty “Song­feng ­Zhihe,” owned by painter Cai Ben­lie; the Yuan-­Dynasty “Qing­shan,” belonging to Hong Kong gu­qin master Tong Kin Woon; the Ming-­Dynasty “Keng­shao,” owned by gu­qin master Sun Yu-chin; and his own Song-Dynasty instrument “Yu­hu­bing.” All have been restored to playable condition thanks to the “emergency care” given by Lin.

For Xue­ye­bing, which he was commissioned to restore by the National Palace Museum, Lin first alternately blew high-pressure steam and cold air into the guts of the gu­qin to remove dust, rotted wood fragments, and the moldy smell, and then carried out repairs on the exterior. Originally the NPM had only requested that he conserve the integrity of this antique, but Lin, feeling that “gu­qin have life—they are living organisms with a voice,” went to great pains to restore the instrument to playing condition and to release its untapped sounds.

Lin recalls that of all the gu­qin that have passed through his hands to be repaired or restored, the most difficult was the Tang-Dynasty instrument ­Tongya. The framework was still there, but on the inside the wood had been bored away by insects. Moreover, the surface was cracked and peeling, like a frozen pond when the ice begins to break up in early spring. Also, there were inscriptions from many famous people on the surface, making restoration that much more difficult.

Lin says that, unable to see the conditions inside, all he could do was use some steel wire to explore the insect damage. Then he took thinly cut strips of ­bamboo, dipped them into raw lacquer or deer-antler varnish, and used them to apply the lacquer or varnish to the damaged places drop by drop, to reinforce and stabilize the wood. As for the peeled lacquer on the surface, in places where the original lacquer could still be used he applied raw lacquer to reattach it to its original location, and where parts of the lacquer were missing he repaired the surface of the gu­qin by making a “skin” of lacquer on another surface, then cutting out pieces one by one to fit the damaged areas and applying them to the surface of the instrument.

The recently restored Song-­Dynasty gu­qin Yu­hu­bing was acquired by Lin from an itinerant vendor in mainland China. This time he went for the big cut, separating the soundboard from the base. After planing off the damaged wood he carefully selected the replacement material, using wood from the Han Dynasty for the repair, for only in this way would the tone be consistent. He spent more than two years restoring this gu­qin. Its tone is excellent, and it has become the instrument used by his son Lin Fa.

An heir who sat on gu­qin

In the middle of last year, Lin Li-­cheng started to teach a “gu­qin hewing experience class.” He demonstrates every step in the process of making a gu­qin, from selecting the materials, cutting out the rough components, and planing them into shape, to applying the varnish and lacquer, inlaying the harmonic position markers, and stringing the instrument. The class is one on 13, and Lin admits, “It’s exhausting for this old codger.” Fortunately he has Lin Fa and a group of apprentices as his teaching assistants, helping to guide the students and attend to their needs.

Lin Fa, Lin Li-­cheng’s second son, is the only one of four brothers to go into the family business. Lin Li-­cheng says that from the time when Lin Fa was small he followed his father around while he was working and did odd jobs for him, and he has acquired a solid grasp of gu­qin making. In the past, Lin Li-­cheng had no clamps for making gu­qin, so he would tell his son to sit on the instru­ments to press the parts together. Lin Fa grew up this way—sitting on gu­qin.

Lin figured that his son would end up making gu­qin for a living, and, afraid that Lin Fa would be disparaged if he was not able to play the instrument himself, ­coaxed and tricked him into going for lessons. Little did he expect that Lin Fa would develop a genuine interest as he learned, and he eventually graduated from the Central Conservatory of Music in Bei­jing with a major in gu­qin performance, followed by further study in the Department of Traditional Music at Tai­pei National University of the Arts. He is now a professional gu­qin performer.

During our visit to Lin’s workshop, one of his apprentices takes out wood for two gu­qin to test the sound. This step, coming before the parts are assembled, uses a tool to simulate the situation after the instrument is strung, to listen to the tone of the wood. If there is anything wrong, it can still be corrected.

We watch as Lin Fa deftly attaches the sound testing tool and his fingers rapidly press and pluck the strings as he listens to the tone. Afterwards he flips the piece of wood over and, with a felt-tip pen, marks several locations that need to be shaved a little thinner to get better tone. Standing off to one side, Lin Li-­cheng explains: “Now we are testing the sound, which I leave completely in his hands. No one is better than him at judging tone. He has been listening since he was small, and has formally studied performance. Academic professors have no contact with the making of gu­qin, so no-one has as deep an appreciation as he does.” These remarks reveal Lin’s pride in his son and his joy that the craft to which he has dedicated his life is being passed on.

Lin’s Zi­zuo­fang workshop, where they have just completed an exhibition on gu­qin making, is a mess. Lin pulls out a gu­qin from who knows where; this is a Qing-­Dynasty instrument that he received in mainland China back in the day. Lin says, “When this gu­qin is repaired, the sound will be amazing.” Hearing this, his apprentices are thrilled, and succinctly discuss the matter, after which they surround Lin and say, “Master, let’s repair it! Let’s repair it together!”

Facing a group of excited apprentices, Lin Li-­cheng, his face wreathed in smiles, says, “OK, let’s repair it together.”

Relevant articles

Recent Articles

繁體中文 日文

只識琴中趣,留連古琴音斲琴者

文‧鄧慧純 圖‧莊坤儒

2003年聯合國教科文組織將古琴藝術列入「無形文化遺產」。但更早在1977年,古琴大師管平湖演奏的《流水》就被收錄進「向外星人傳達人類問候」的金唱片中,搭上美國國家航空暨太空總署的探險家太空船到外太空。

我們不知至今外星人是否聽到《流水》了,但是林立正卻被這有著悠久歷史的樂器古琴所演奏的《流水》而撼動,自此開啟他斲琴(指製作古琴之技術)、修復古琴的生涯。


 

曾是遠洋漁業船長的林立正,跑遍的地方已族繁不及備載。長年生活在海上,林立正說他聽這曲《流水》很多回了,卻在某一天,在古琴的旋律中感受到流水的磅礴,琴音勾起他的船旅生涯中的回憶,遭遇風浪時一切操之在天的無助、恐懼,及對大自然萌生的敬畏。

當時被古琴的音色吸引,而動手製琴則是受朋友請託。古琴的形制自唐以下無大更變,上下兩片板子,刨空內部形成共鳴空間,再配上7根弦。有木工、漆工底子的林立正自覺做得來,就著古書便開始鑽研,途中又拜古琴大師孫毓芹為師,林立正解釋,孫毓芹以演奏見長,非以製琴著稱,但在觀念上提點他,往好的方向邁進。

現已八十多歲的林立正,大半輩子都在斲琴、修琴。2009年他獲選為「台北市文化資產保存技術保存者」,是斲琴藝術受官方肯定的第一人。

擇良木,求美音

古琴的音色取決於木頭,老木料尤佳。從老房子、寺廟上換下來的木頭都是林立正的最愛。為擇良材,年輕時的他在跑船之餘,常常一上陸就往山裡鑽,一待就一個多月,沿著溪谷,找倒木。林立正解釋,水能把木材處理的最好,倒在水裡的木頭,枝幹中的樹脂、蛋白質和醣類都被水沖刷掉,木材細胞的空隙大了,更利於共鳴。

早年,他曾溯立霧溪而上,忽在溪水中發現一段枯幹,是製琴的良材。拿著鋸子潛下水,林立正在水中與急流、阻力奮戰,千辛萬苦鋸下一小截木頭。這段木料後來做了兩床琴,一床就是他至今最滿意的作品「古澗泉」。「古澗泉」三字是古琴大師孫毓芹在琴裡落款,寫下「此材由林君立正取自深山古澗泉中」,爰以「古澗泉」命名。「古澗泉」轉手後,聽說去了美國,後來又回台灣,但林立正始終沒機會再看過它。林立正有個心願:「從前做的外型和漆藝都不行,我始終希望(古澗泉)能夠回來,我再幫它完善一點。」

年紀漸長,身體已不堪屢入山林的操勞。兩岸開放後,林立正改從中國大陸找老木材。他說適才適所,別人不愛的材料,在他眼中卻是寶,林立正拿到木料就知道做出來的琴會是什麼音色、什麼等級,把別人看不上眼的木頭,經過自己巧手改造,成為名琴的過程,是製琴讓人著迷之處。

慢工細活,斲好琴

製琴的步驟工序,林立正多從古書中學來。他表示,古代傳承的技法至今改變有限,可是透過鑽研,他理解每一道工序所謂何來,再精進改良。如琴面的木料多用質材較為鬆軟的梧桐或杉木類;琴底則是軟、硬木皆可,這是他累積四十多年的經驗法則。

而古書記載要把琴體上灰,他也實際操作,從中藥行買來鹿角,表面的動物性蛋白和黴菌需經數次水煮,才能去味。經夏日陽光曝曬,再把中心的髓挖掉,研磨成粉後,混合生漆成為鹿角灰。林立正說明,鹿角磨成粉後,在顯微鏡下觀察,顆粒類似雪的結晶,中間有許多空隙,再調入生漆敷在琴體上,就等於每一個分子都輔助古琴傳音和共鳴。

在琴體表面鋪上鹿角灰,還有類似補土的作用。木材因夏冬生長速度不同,冬天長得結實且密,夏天則質地鬆軟,因此木材表面久了一定會凹凸不平。鹿角灰能阻絕木料接觸空氣,減少變形風化的速度,能維持古琴表面的平整。

在程序上,將琴體均勻刷上鹿角灰後,把琴掛起陰乾,靜置20~30日,待鹿角灰乾透,再以磨石沾水將琴面打磨平整,上灰加上水磨的工序要循環三次。做一床琴至少一年半,半點投機不成。

這些理解、技法和態度,他都一步步傳承給兒子林法和學生。林立正從1996年成立「造琴技藝研究班」,開班授課,1998年更名為「梓作坊」。從1974年完成第一床琴,已經過了22個年頭,他自覺技術圓熟了,才敢開班收徒弟。如今徒弟有六十多人,還有遠從香港來學斲琴的。斲琴班每隔兩三年辦一次斲琴展,向大眾推廣古琴藝術。

巧手修琴,復古音

林立正製琴的名聲漸在古琴界傳開,開始有人找他修琴。他修過不少舉世名琴,國立故宮博物院的元琴「雪夜冰」、古琴名家張清治收藏的唐琴「桐雅」、畫家蔡本烈的宋琴「松風致和」、香港唐建垣的元琴「青山」和孫毓芹之明琴「鏗韶」,還有宋琴「玉壺冰」,都經他急救後能再發聲。

受故宮委託修復的「雪夜冰」,推測是元朝製琴家朱致遠製造。林立正曾為此寫下一篇〈修琴記〉,記錄如何以高壓蒸氣和冷空氣交替吹入琴腹內,去除琴體的灰塵、腐爛木屑及霉味,再把外觀修整完成。原初故宮只要求保持古物的完整即可,但林立正覺得「琴是有生命、有聲音的活體」,故不只修復表面,更願意大費周章地把琴修復到能夠彈奏,並發揮其蘊藏的音色。

林立正回憶,經手修復的古琴中,最慘烈的該是唐琴「桐雅」。骨架還在,但內部木材被蟲蛀蝕;琴面剝裂、斷紋皆是,他形容像初春剛破冰的海面,讓人不難想像是如何地肝腸寸斷。更有甚者,這床名琴有許多名人在琴面落款,更加深修復的難度。

百廢待興,怎麼下手?林立正說明,琴腹的木材被蟲蛀掉了,見不著內部的情況,就只能拿著鐵絲從破損處鑽入,探測木頭被蟲吃掉的狀況,再用削成細細的竹籤,沾上生漆跟鹿角灰,探進破損處,一點一滴地把被吃掉的木頭填實,鞏固木材。琴面的狀況要先拍照記錄,才能依原樣修補。已剝離的漆皮還能使用的就用生漆再黏回原處;遇到缺損的情況,只能另作新的漆皮,且要依著破損的形狀,一片片裁剪切割後再貼回。林立正補充說,因為漆皮在空氣中很脆弱,要放到水中施作方可減輕阻力,但這又增加修復的難度。

晚近修復的宋琴「玉壺冰」,則是林立正在中國大陸的流動攤上尋著的。他說:「這琴當初損爛到從外觀根本看不出是床古琴,要內行人才能一眼辨識出來。」這回他大刀一剖,分解琴面和琴底,把損壞的木頭刨除後,填補的木料另有講究,宋朝的琴他用漢朝的木頭修補,這樣音色才能相近。其餘就依著製琴的工序一道道施作,這床琴修復花了兩年多,不但音色極佳,也成了兒子林法的御用琴。

坐在琴上的傳人

去年年中,林立正開了斲琴體驗班,從選料、製作粗胚、刨刮成形、上灰、上漆、定徽、上弦逐個步驟把手教。一對十三,他直言:「累死我這頭老牛。」所幸有兒子林法和一群師兄、師姐當助教,幫著張羅、指導。

林法,是林立正的二兒子,四個兄弟中,只有他繼承家業。林立正說,林法從小跟著他工作、打雜,製琴他學得最紮實。以前製琴沒有夾具,要有人幫忙壓著,就叫孩子坐著壓,林法就是這樣坐著琴長大。

林立正想著兒子未來終究要接他的衣缽製琴,怕他不會彈琴被外界批評,就哄著、騙著兒子去學琴,未料到林法居然學出興趣來,在北京中央音樂學院古琴演奏專業畢業,又回台灣在國立臺北藝術大學傳統音樂學系深造。現在是專業的古琴演奏者,走出了自己的路。

採訪途中,有個徒弟拿了兩床琴來試音。這步驟是在合琴前先以工具模擬,假裝上弦,先聽木胚的音色如何,若有不妥還可補救修正。

只見林法俐落的裝上試音工具,手指快速的在琴面壓弦、撥弦、聽音。然後翻過琴面,用筆圈出數個部位,告訴他槽腹要再修薄一點,音色才好。而林立正在一旁跟我說明:「現在要試音,都交給他。要聽音色,沒有人能比他更強。從小聽到大,又正式去學演奏,學院派的教授都沒接觸過製琴這一塊,所以沒有人像他感觸那麼深。」他語間透露了對兒子的驕傲和一生志業得以傳續的喜悅。

剛辦完斲琴展的梓作坊,工作室內還一片凌亂,林立正不知從何處翻出了一把古琴,說明這是他當年在中國大陸收到的清朝古琴。琴體雅致,卻只修了一半,擱著就忘了。林立正說:「這床琴修好後,聲音會不得了。」徒兒們聞言雀躍不已,三言兩語地討論,纏著林立正說:「師傅,修吧!修吧!我們一起修。」

面對著一群興致高昂的子弟,只見林立正帶著笑意說:「好,一起修。」

琴のみに思いを注ぎ、古音を愛する

文・鄧慧純 写真・莊坤儒 翻訳・久保 恵子

中国に古くから伝わる七弦琴である古琴芸術は、2003年にユネスコの無形文化遺産に登録された。しかし、1977年にNASAが惑星探査機ボイジャーを打ち上げた時に、そこに宇宙人へのメッセージとして搭載されたゴールデンレコードには、すでに古琴の大家である管平湖が演奏する「流水」が収録され、ボイジャーと共に遥かな宇宙に向っていた。

宇宙人がこの「流水」を聞いたかどうかは定かではないが、悠久の歴史を持つ楽器である古琴で演奏された「流水」は、林立正に深い感動を残した。ここから彼は、古琴の製作と修復の道に進むことを決意し、その古琴生涯を歩み始めることとなったのである。


かつて遠洋漁業の船長として、世界各地の多くの場所を回ってきた林立正は、その長い海上生活において何回となく「流水」を聞いてきた。それがある日、何気なく聞いた古琴の旋律から澎湃と流れる水の力を感じたという。そして、長い遠洋漁業の船上生活を思い起した。嵐に遭った時のすべては天任せで、その恐怖と大自然への畏敬の念が蘇ってきた。

その頃、古琴の音色に惹かれてはいたが、実際に製作を始めたのは友人の依頼からだった。古琴の形状は唐代の昔から大きく変わってはいない。まず上下二枚の板を合わせ、その内部を刳り抜いて共鳴空間を形成し、これに7本の弦を張るというものである。木工や漆の経験があった林立正は、これなら自分にも出来るだろうと、古書を開いて研究を始めた。その間に、古琴の大家である孫毓芹に師事したこともある。師は演奏者として著名であったが、製作者ではなかった。それでも琴の観念について師から指導を受けることで、琴製作の方向性を確認することができたという。

現在80余歳となる林立正は、その生涯の大半を琴の製作と修復に捧げてきた。その後、2009年には「台北市文化資産保存技術保存者」に指定され、古琴製作の第一人者として公的に認められることとなった。

良木で決まる音色

古琴の音色は材料の木で決まり、しかも古い木材ほどいいとされている。そこで古民家や寺の修復で出た廃材を、林立正は求めて歩いた。良木を選ぶため、若い頃は船を下り、陸に上がれば山に一カ月も籠り続け、渓流に沿って倒木を探した。林立正によると、木材を処理するのには、水が一番いいという。水に浸かった倒木は、幹や枝の樹脂やタンパク質、糖質が水で洗い流され、細胞間に隙間が残されるため、共鳴しやすくなるという。

かつて、立霧渓を遡上していた時に、水中に古琴に向く枯れた幹を見つけた。そこで鋸を手に急流に潜り、苦心惨憺の末に幹の一部を切り出すことができた。その切り出した幹で琴二張を制作したのだが、そのうちの一張が今でも最も気に入った作品「古<َ泉」である。「古<َ泉」とは、師の孫毓芹が題した落款で、そこには「林立正君が深山の古<َ泉より材を得たものである」と、木材の由来を記してあった。

その後、この琴を人に譲ってしまい、アメリカに渡ったとの噂も流れたが、その後台湾に戻ったともいう。しかし、林立正は今に至るも「古<َ泉」を二度と目にしてはいない。そこで彼はこの琴をいつか取り戻したいと思っている。「以前の外観や漆の技術はまだまだだったので、できるなら古<َ泉をもう一度手にして、完璧なものに仕上げたい」と願っているのである。

年を重ねるにつれて、今では山林に入ることもできなくなった。中国大陸との往来が自由化されてからは、林立正は大陸に古材を求めて出かけている。適材適所と言うが、他の人の目には価値のない木材でも、彼が見れば宝になるのかもしれない。木材を手に取ると、林立正はどのような音色で、どのくらいのランクかが判別できる。その眼鏡にかなえば、自分の技術で素晴らしい音色の琴に生まれ変わらせる。それが古琴製作の醍醐味でもある。

丁寧な仕事で良い琴を

古琴製造の工程の多くは古書から学んだものであり、古代から伝わる技法は今に至るも大きな変化はない。しかし、研究を重ね各工程の意味を理解し、改善を続けてきた。琴の上板には桐や杉などの軽く柔らかい木材を用い、下板には硬い木材を用いる。この組合せも、40年余りをかけた経験による法則なのである。

古書の記載では、表面に漆を混ぜた灰を塗るのだが、灰と言っても実際には漢方薬店で購入した鹿の角を加工処理して用いる。鹿角の表面のタンパク質やカビなどは何回も水で煮て除去し、これをさらに日に晒して、中心の髄を取り除き、これを粉に挽いてから漆に混ぜて、ようやく琴に用いられるようになる。林立正によると、顕微鏡で観察した鹿の角の粒子には、雪の結晶のように隙間が多く、これを漆に混ぜて塗ると、それぞれの分子が琴の共鳴を助けるのだそうである。

琴の表面に、粉状の鹿の角を混ぜた漆を塗るのは、凸凹を均一にするためでもある。木の生長は夏と冬で速度が異なり、材質は冬に育った部分はしっかりとして緊密で、夏に育った部分は柔らかく脆い。そのため、時間が経つと、表面が凸凹になっている。また鹿角が入った漆を塗った表面は空気を遮断し、板の風化の速度を抑えるので、琴の表面を長く平滑に保つことができるという利点もあるという。

工程を見ると、琴に鹿角の粉を混ぜた漆を均等に塗ってから、少なくとも20〜30日は陰干ししなければならない。しっかり乾かしてから、水に濡らした砥石で磨き、また漆を塗り、これを三回繰り返す。琴一張の制作には少なくとも1年半はかかり、すこしも手を抜くことはできない。

こういった研究の成果と技法、製作の態度を、林立正は息子の林法と弟子に少しずつ伝えていった。林立正は1996年に琴製作技術研究コースを開設し、技術を教え始めて、1998年には「梓作坊」と名を改めた。1974年に最初の琴を製作してから22年後、ようやく技術に習熟したと感じ、1996年になって講座を開設し、製作技法を教えることにしたのである。

これまでに講義を受けた弟子は60人余りに上り、香港から受講に来る人もいたという。また数年に一回は製作した琴の展覧会を開催し、一般向けの古琴芸術普及に努めてきた。

古琴修復により蘇る古音

林立正が製作した琴が評判となると、古琴修復の依頼を受けるようになった。

その修復した古琴の中には、世に知られた名琴も少なくない。国立故宮博物院所蔵の元代の琴「雪夜氷」、古琴の大家・張清治所蔵の唐代の琴「桐雅」、画家の蔡本烈が所蔵する宋代の琴「松風致和」、香港のコレクター唐建垣所蔵の元代の琴「青山」、孫毓芹所蔵の明代の琴「鏘韶」に加えて、宋代の「玉壺氷」など、どれもその優れた修復技術でかつての音を取り戻した名琴である。

故宮博物院より修復の依頼を受けた琴「雪夜氷」は、元代の琴の大家・朱致遠の作と伝わる。林立正は修復の経過を「修琴記」として記録したが、それによると、高圧の蒸気と冷気を交互に琴の内部に吹き込んで、積った塵や腐敗した木屑や黴を除去してから、外観を整えたとある。当初の故宮博物院からの依頼は、外観を整えればよいということだったが、林立正は「琴は生命と音のある生きた楽器」と考えており、表面を整えるだけではなく、手間暇をかけて演奏可能な状態に修復し、秘められた音色を引き出そうとしたのである。

林立正によると、修復した古琴の中で状態が一番悲惨だったのは唐代の琴「桐雅」だと言う。大枠は残っていたが、内部の木材には虫食いがあり、上板の漆は剥げかかって、表面は春に流氷の漂う海面のように細かく裂け目が入っていたのである。見るだけで心が痛む状況だった。しかも、裏を見ると多くの著名な文人の落款が刻まれていて、それが修復をさらに困難にしていた。

それでは、どう修復したのであろうか。林立正の説明によると、内部の木材はあちこちに虫食いがあったが、内部の状況を直接見ることができないので、破損した部分から鉄線を入れて、虫食いの状況を調べたという。それから、細く削った竹べらに、鹿角の灰を混ぜた漆を載せて、破損した部分に差し込んで、虫食い部分を少しずつ埋めていくことで、木材をしっかり固めていった。

また、修復前には琴の表面を撮影しておき、それを基にもとの状態に戻すこととした。表面から剥がれかかった漆の層は、別の漆で接着できるようであれば元の場所に貼り、漆が欠けている場合は新たに塗り直す。その場所ごとの破損の状況により、少しずつ原状の形に基づいて、剥がれた漆を貼付け、塗り直した。林立正によると、漆の層は空気中にあっては脆弱なので、水中で作業すると崩れにくくなるのだが、水中の作業はまた別の問題が出てくるのだと説明を加えた。

最近になって修復した宋代の琴「玉壺氷」は、林立正が中国大陸の露天商で見つけたものである。「この琴は、最初に見つけた時には破損がひどく、パッと見たところは琴には見えませんでしたが、玄人ならすぐに古琴と見分けられます」と説明する。

その修復では破損がひどく、大鉈を振るうことになった。まず上板と下板を外して、損壊した部分を取り除き、別の木材を接いだのである。その接ぐ木材だが、宋代の琴には漢代の木材を用いて修復し、かつての音色に整えた。この琴の修復には2年余りの時間がかかったが、その甲斐あって音色は素晴らしく、息子の林法の専用の琴となった。

琴に座る後継者

林立正は去年、古琴製作の体験コースを開催した。木材の選定から始まり、大まかな形を作り、板を合せ、削って成形してから、灰と漆を塗り重ねていき、乾いたら音の高さの目印を決め、弦を張っていく。その工程すべてを自ら教えた。参加者13人に1人で向き合う課程は、「この老骨には応えました」と言うが、幸い息子の林法と、かつての弟子たちが準備や指導を手伝ってくれた。

林立正の次男の林法は、四人兄弟の中で唯一人、父の技を受け継いでくれた。林立正によると、小さい頃から父の仕事を手伝ってきた林法は、琴製作においてもしっかり基礎から学んできたという。以前は琴製作専用の冶具(上板と下板を固定する器具)がなかったため、誰かを座らせて固定しなければならなかった。そこで、林立正は、いつも息子を座らせていたのだという。林法はこうして、琴に座って大きくなった後継者なのである。

林立正は息子の将来を思い、いつかは衣鉢を継いでほしいと願っていたが、琴を演奏できないと批判されるのではと心配した。そこで、琴の演奏を学ばせようとあれこれと手を尽くして、その甲斐あって林法は演奏に興味を持つようになった。北京中央音楽院の古琴演奏科を卒業し、台湾に戻ってからは国立台北芸術大学伝統音楽学科で学業を究めた。現在ではプロの古琴演奏者として、自分の道を進んでいる。

インタビューの途中で、弟子の一人が二張の琴を持ち込んで、音のテストを始めた。音のテストは上板と下板を最終的に張り合せる前に、道具を用いて仮に合わせて弦を張り、音色を試すもので、何か問題があれば、そこで修正ができる。

すると、林法がてきぱきとテストのための工具を取り付け、素早く弦を張り、弾いて音を試しているのを目にした。音を試し終ると、上板を外して何か所かに丸を付け、この部分をもう少し薄く削ると音がよくなると指導しているのである。林立正は傍らにあって「音のテストは、今では全て林法に任せています。音色を判断するには彼より優れている者はいません。小さい頃から琴の音を聞いて育ち、学校で正式に演奏を学んでいます。一方、音楽大学の教授たちは琴の製作に関わったことはないので、林法のような音色の感覚は持てないのです」と語る。その言葉の端々に優秀な息子を誇りと思い、自身の一生を賭けた琴製作に、この後継者を得た喜びが透けて見えた。

製作した琴の展覧会を行ったばかりの「梓作坊」の中は整理が行き届かず、あちこち散らかっていたが、林立正はどこからか古琴一張を取り出してきて、これはかつて中国大陸で入手した清朝の琴だという。琴の姿は上品だが、修復の途中でそのままになっていたのだそうである。「この琴は修復するとよい音が鳴りますよ」と言うと、弟子たちはそれを聞いてどう修復するか楽しそうに議論を始めた。そして林立正に「先生、修復してください。一緒にやりましょう」と、話しかけてきた。

興味津々で興奮気味の弟子たちに向って、林立正は「よし、一緒に修復しよう」とうれしそうに答えた。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!